A Wolf in Sheep's Clothing: Generalized Nested Jailbreak Prompts can Fool Large Language Models Easily

2311.08268

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Published 4/9/2024 by Peng Ding, Jun Kuang, Dan Ma, Xuezhi Cao, Yunsen Xian, Jiajun Chen, Shujian Huang

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Abstract

Large Language Models (LLMs), such as ChatGPT and GPT-4, are designed to provide useful and safe responses. However, adversarial prompts known as 'jailbreaks' can circumvent safeguards, leading LLMs to generate potentially harmful content. Exploring jailbreak prompts can help to better reveal the weaknesses of LLMs and further steer us to secure them. Unfortunately, existing jailbreak methods either suffer from intricate manual design or require optimization on other white-box models, which compromises either generalization or efficiency. In this paper, we generalize jailbreak prompt attacks into two aspects: (1) Prompt Rewriting and (2) Scenario Nesting. Based on this, we propose ReNeLLM, an automatic framework that leverages LLMs themselves to generate effective jailbreak prompts. Extensive experiments demonstrate that ReNeLLM significantly improves the attack success rate while greatly reducing the time cost compared to existing baselines. Our study also reveals the inadequacy of current defense methods in safeguarding LLMs. Finally, we analyze the failure of LLMs defense from the perspective of prompt execution priority, and propose corresponding defense strategies. We hope that our research can catalyze both the academic community and LLMs developers towards the provision of safer and more regulated LLMs. The code is available at https://github.com/NJUNLP/ReNeLLM.

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Overview

  • Large Language Models (LLMs) like ChatGPT and GPT-4 are designed to provide useful and safe responses
  • However, 'jailbreak' prompts can circumvent their safeguards, leading to potentially harmful content
  • Exploring jailbreak prompts can help reveal LLM weaknesses and improve security
  • Existing jailbreak methods suffer from manual design or require optimization on other models, compromising generalization or efficiency

Plain English Explanation

Large language models (LLMs) like ChatGPT and GPT-4 are very advanced AI systems that can generate human-like text on a wide range of topics. These models are designed with safeguards to ensure they provide useful and safe responses.

However, researchers have discovered that it's possible to bypass these safeguards using a technique called 'jailbreaking'. This involves crafting special prompts that trick the model into generating potentially harmful or undesirable content. By exploring and understanding jailbreak prompts, researchers can better understand the weaknesses of LLMs and work to make them more secure.

The challenge is that existing jailbreak methods either require a lot of manual effort to design the prompts, or they rely on optimizing the prompts on other models, which can limit how well they work on the target LLM. This paper proposes a new approach called ReNeLLM that uses the LLMs themselves to automatically generate effective jailbreak prompts. The researchers show that this approach significantly improves the success rate of the attacks while also being much faster than previous methods.

This research highlights the importance of continually testing and improving the security of large language models as they become more powerful and widely used. By understanding the vulnerabilities of these systems, the academic community and LLM developers can work together to make them safer and more trustworthy for real-world applications.

Technical Explanation

This paper proposes a new framework called ReNeLLM that can automatically generate effective jailbreak prompts for large language models (LLMs) like ChatGPT and GPT-4.

The key innovation is that ReNeLLM generalizes jailbreak prompt attacks into two main components: (1) Prompt Rewriting and (2) Scenario Nesting. Prompt Rewriting involves modifying the language of the prompt to bypass the model's safeguards, while Scenario Nesting involves embedding the malicious intent within a benign narrative.

By leveraging the LLMs themselves to generate these jailbreak prompts, ReNeLLM is able to significantly improve the attack success rate compared to existing manual or optimization-based approaches. The authors' extensive experiments demonstrate that ReNeLLM can achieve much higher success rates while also requiring less time to generate the prompts.

The paper also reveals the inadequacy of current defense methods in protecting LLMs from these types of attacks. The authors analyze the failure of LLM defenses from the perspective of prompt execution priority and propose corresponding strategies to improve security.

Critical Analysis

The research presented in this paper makes an important contribution to understanding the security vulnerabilities of large language models. By developing an automated framework for generating effective jailbreak prompts, the authors have shed light on a critical challenge facing the widespread deployment of these powerful AI systems.

That said, the paper does not address some potential limitations and caveats. For instance, it's unclear how generalizable the ReNeLLM approach is to other types of LLMs beyond the ones tested. There may also be ways for model developers to adapt their defenses to become more resilient against this specific type of attack.

Additionally, the paper focuses solely on the technical aspects of jailbreaking and does not consider the broader ethical implications. While the research aims to improve LLM security, there is a risk that the techniques could be misused by bad actors to cause harm. Careful consideration of responsible disclosure and development practices is essential.

Overall, this paper represents an important step forward in jailbreaking research and prompt-based attacks on large language models. However, continued vigilance and a collaborative approach between researchers, developers, and end-users will be necessary to ensure these powerful AI systems are deployed in a safe and ethical manner.

Conclusion

This paper introduces ReNeLLM, a new framework for automatically generating effective jailbreak prompts that can bypass the safeguards of large language models like ChatGPT and GPT-4. The research demonstrates that ReNeLLM significantly outperforms existing jailbreak methods in terms of both success rate and efficiency.

By revealing the inadequacy of current LLM defense strategies, this work highlights the critical need for continued security research and development in this rapidly evolving field. The authors' analysis of prompt execution priority provides a promising direction for improving the robustness of these systems.

Overall, this paper represents an important contribution to the ongoing effort to make large language models more secure and trustworthy. As these AI systems become increasingly integrated into our daily lives, ensuring their safety and reliability will be of paramount importance. The insights and techniques presented here can help catalyze further progress towards that goal.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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