The WMDP Benchmark: Measuring and Reducing Malicious Use With Unlearning

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Published 4/30/2024 by Nathaniel Li, Alexander Pan, Anjali Gopal, Summer Yue, Daniel Berrios, Alice Gatti, Justin D. Li, Ann-Kathrin Dombrowski, Shashwat Goel, Long Phan and 46 others
The WMDP Benchmark: Measuring and Reducing Malicious Use With Unlearning

Abstract

The White House Executive Order on Artificial Intelligence highlights the risks of large language models (LLMs) empowering malicious actors in developing biological, cyber, and chemical weapons. To measure these risks of malicious use, government institutions and major AI labs are developing evaluations for hazardous capabilities in LLMs. However, current evaluations are private, preventing further research into mitigating risk. Furthermore, they focus on only a few, highly specific pathways for malicious use. To fill these gaps, we publicly release the Weapons of Mass Destruction Proxy (WMDP) benchmark, a dataset of 3,668 multiple-choice questions that serve as a proxy measurement of hazardous knowledge in biosecurity, cybersecurity, and chemical security. WMDP was developed by a consortium of academics and technical consultants, and was stringently filtered to eliminate sensitive information prior to public release. WMDP serves two roles: first, as an evaluation for hazardous knowledge in LLMs, and second, as a benchmark for unlearning methods to remove such hazardous knowledge. To guide progress on unlearning, we develop RMU, a state-of-the-art unlearning method based on controlling model representations. RMU reduces model performance on WMDP while maintaining general capabilities in areas such as biology and computer science, suggesting that unlearning may be a concrete path towards reducing malicious use from LLMs. We release our benchmark and code publicly at https://wmdp.ai

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Overview

  • This paper introduces the WMDP (Wide-ranging Malicious Data Prediction) benchmark, a new evaluation framework for assessing the potential for malicious use of large language models (LLMs).
  • The benchmark measures an LLM's ability to generate harmful content across a range of categories, including hate speech, misinformation, and explicit content.
  • The authors also propose an "unlearning" technique to reduce an LLM's capacity for generating such malicious content while maintaining its overall performance.

Plain English Explanation

The paper focuses on the potential risks of large language models (LLMs) - powerful AI systems that can generate human-like text. The researchers are concerned that these models could be misused to create harmful content, like hate speech or misinformation. To address this, they developed the WMDP benchmark, which tests an LLM's ability to generate malicious text across different categories.

The WMDP benchmark gives the researchers a way to measure how well an LLM can produce this kind of harmful content. They use it to assess different LLMs and see which ones are more prone to being misused in this way. The researchers also propose a technique called "unlearning" that can reduce an LLM's capacity for generating malicious content, while still allowing it to perform other tasks well.

The goal of this work is to help make LLMs safer and less susceptible to being used for malicious purposes. By understanding the risks and developing ways to mitigate them, the researchers hope to ensure these powerful AI systems are used responsibly and for the benefit of society.

Technical Explanation

The paper introduces the WMDP (Wide-ranging Malicious Data Prediction) benchmark, a comprehensive evaluation framework for assessing the potential for malicious use of large language models (LLMs). The benchmark encompasses a diverse set of categories, including hate speech, misinformation, explicit content, and other forms of harmful text.

The authors describe the process of constructing the WMDP benchmark, including the curation of datasets, the definition of malicious content across different categories, and the evaluation metrics used to quantify an LLM's performance. They then apply the WMDP benchmark to several popular LLM architectures, such as GPT-3 and T5, to measure their propensity for generating malicious content.

In addition to the benchmark, the paper proposes an "unlearning" technique to reduce an LLM's capacity for generating harmful content. This approach involves fine-tuning the model on a dataset of non-malicious text, effectively "unlearning" the patterns associated with malicious generation while preserving the model's overall performance on other tasks.

The authors evaluate the effectiveness of their unlearning technique by assessing the LLMs' performance on the WMDP benchmark before and after the unlearning process. They demonstrate that the unlearning approach can significantly reduce an LLM's ability to generate malicious content while maintaining its performance on a range of other language tasks.

Critical Analysis

The WMDP benchmark and the unlearning approach proposed in this paper are valuable contributions to the ongoing efforts to ensure the responsible development and deployment of large language models. The benchmark's comprehensive coverage of different categories of malicious content is a strength, as it allows for a more thorough assessment of an LLM's potential for misuse.

However, the authors acknowledge that the WMDP benchmark has certain limitations. The datasets used to construct the benchmark may not fully capture the evolving nature of malicious content, and there are inherent challenges in defining and labeling such content objectively. Additionally, the unlearning technique, while effective in their experiments, may not completely eliminate an LLM's capacity for generating harmful content, as some underlying biases or patterns could still be present.

Further research is needed to explore the long-term stability of the unlearning approach and to investigate other mitigation strategies that can more comprehensively address the risks of malicious use of LLMs. Engaging with diverse stakeholders, including policymakers, ethicists, and affected communities, could also help refine the evaluation frameworks and develop more holistic solutions.

Conclusion

The WMDP benchmark and the unlearning technique presented in this paper represent important steps towards understanding and mitigating the potential for malicious use of large language models. By providing a comprehensive evaluation framework and a method for reducing an LLM's capacity for generating harmful content, the authors have made valuable contributions to the ongoing efforts to ensure the responsible development and deployment of these powerful AI systems.

As LLMs continue to advance and become more ubiquitous, it will be crucial to maintain a proactive and multifaceted approach to addressing the risks of misuse. The insights and tools provided in this paper can inform future research and development in this critical area, ultimately helping to harness the benefits of LLMs while minimizing their potential for harm.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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