Understanding Video Transformers via Universal Concept Discovery

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Published 4/11/2024 by Matthew Kowal, Achal Dave, Rares Ambrus, Adrien Gaidon, Konstantinos G. Derpanis, Pavel Tokmakov
Understanding Video Transformers via Universal Concept Discovery

Abstract

This paper studies the problem of concept-based interpretability of transformer representations for videos. Concretely, we seek to explain the decision-making process of video transformers based on high-level, spatiotemporal concepts that are automatically discovered. Prior research on concept-based interpretability has concentrated solely on image-level tasks. Comparatively, video models deal with the added temporal dimension, increasing complexity and posing challenges in identifying dynamic concepts over time. In this work, we systematically address these challenges by introducing the first Video Transformer Concept Discovery (VTCD) algorithm. To this end, we propose an efficient approach for unsupervised identification of units of video transformer representations - concepts, and ranking their importance to the output of a model. The resulting concepts are highly interpretable, revealing spatio-temporal reasoning mechanisms and object-centric representations in unstructured video models. Performing this analysis jointly over a diverse set of supervised and self-supervised representations, we discover that some of these mechanism are universal in video transformers. Finally, we show that VTCD can be used for fine-grained action recognition and video object segmentation.

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Overview

  • This paper explores how to better understand the inner workings of video transformer models, which are a type of deep learning model used for video analysis tasks.
  • The researchers propose a new method called "universal concept discovery" that can identify the key visual concepts that video transformers rely on to make predictions.
  • By understanding these underlying concepts, the researchers aim to provide more transparent and interpretable video transformer models.

Plain English Explanation

Video transformers are a powerful type of deep learning model that have shown impressive performance on various video analysis tasks, such as action recognition and video captioning. However, these models can be difficult to interpret and understand, as they learn complex patterns from the data without always exposing the reasoning behind their predictions.

The researchers behind this paper wanted to shed light on how video transformers work under the hood. They developed a new technique called "universal concept discovery" that can identify the key visual concepts that these models rely on when making decisions. The idea is that by understanding the fundamental building blocks the models use, we can gain deeper insights into their inner workings and make them more transparent.

To illustrate this, imagine a video transformer model that is tasked with recognizing different types of sports in videos. Instead of just seeing the model output a label like "basketball," the universal concept discovery method could reveal that the model is focusing on things like the shape of the ball, the court markings, and the players' movement patterns. This type of information can help explain why the model made a particular prediction and make it more trustworthy.

By applying their universal concept discovery approach to various video transformer models, the researchers were able to uncover the specific visual concepts that these models find most useful for different video understanding tasks. This provides valuable clues about how the models are processing and interpreting the video data, which can in turn inform efforts to enhance the efficiency of vision transformer networks and advance explainable AI models.

Technical Explanation

The core of the researchers' approach is a method they call "universal concept discovery" (UCD), which aims to identify the key visual concepts that a video transformer model relies on to make its predictions. The UCD process involves several steps:

  1. Concept bank generation: The researchers first create a "concept bank" - a set of visual concepts that could potentially be relevant for the video understanding tasks at hand. This concept bank is generated by leveraging existing language-informed visual concept learning techniques.

  2. Concept activation mapping: Next, the researchers map the activations of the video transformer model to the concepts in the bank, revealing which concepts the model is responding to the most for a given input video.

  3. Concept importance ranking: By analyzing the concept activation patterns across many input videos, the researchers can then rank the importance of each concept, identifying the most salient visual building blocks the model uses.

The researchers applied this UCD framework to analyze several state-of-the-art video transformer models, including ViViT, TimeSformer, and VideoSwin Transformer. Their analysis provided insights into the models' reliance on factors like object appearance, motion patterns, and scene context when making video understanding predictions.

Critical Analysis

The researchers acknowledge several limitations of their work. First, the quality of the UCD analysis is dependent on the comprehensiveness of the initial concept bank. While the researchers leveraged existing methods to construct a broad set of visual concepts, there may be important concepts missing that the models are implicitly learning.

Additionally, the UCD framework relies on gradient-based attribution methods, which can be sensitive to factors like model initialization and optimization. The researchers note that alternative concept-based analysis techniques may provide complementary insights.

Another potential issue is that the UCD analysis only reveals the visual concepts the models are using, but does not necessarily explain how those concepts are being combined and weighted to arrive at final predictions. Motion inversion and video customization techniques could potentially provide a richer understanding of the models' underlying reasoning.

Despite these limitations, the universal concept discovery approach represents an important step towards making video transformer models more transparent and interpretable. By surfacing the key visual concepts these models rely on, the researchers have provided a valuable tool for advancing ante-hoc explainable AI models in the video domain.

Conclusion

This paper introduces a novel technique called "universal concept discovery" that can identify the fundamental visual building blocks underlying video transformer models. By applying this method to several state-of-the-art video transformer architectures, the researchers were able to gain valuable insights into how these models process and interpret video data.

The findings from this work not only advance our understanding of video transformers, but also have broader implications for improving the transparency and interpretability of deep learning models in the video domain. As AI systems become increasingly ubiquitous in real-world applications, techniques like universal concept discovery will be crucial for ensuring these models are trustworthy and accountable.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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