Ten Hard Problems in Artificial Intelligence We Must Get Right

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Published 4/22/2024 by Gavin Leech, Simson Garfinkel, Misha Yagudin, Alexander Briand, Aleksandr Zhuravlev

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Abstract

We explore the AI2050 hard problems that block the promise of AI and cause AI risks: (1) developing general capabilities of the systems; (2) assuring the performance of AI systems and their training processes; (3) aligning system goals with human goals; (4) enabling great applications of AI in real life; (5) addressing economic disruptions; (6) ensuring the participation of all; (7) at the same time ensuring socially responsible deployment; (8) addressing any geopolitical disruptions that AI causes; (9) promoting sound governance of the technology; and (10) managing the philosophical disruptions for humans living in the age of AI. For each problem, we outline the area, identify significant recent work, and suggest ways forward. [Note: this paper reviews literature through January 2023.]

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Overview

  • The paper explores 10 "hard problems" that are currently blocking the full promise of AI and causing AI risks.
  • These problems cover areas such as developing general AI capabilities, ensuring AI system performance and alignment with human goals, enabling real-world AI applications, addressing economic and societal disruptions, and promoting responsible AI governance.
  • For each problem, the paper outlines the key challenges, summarizes recent research, and suggests potential ways forward.

Plain English Explanation

The paper looks at 10 major challenges that are preventing AI from fully realizing its potential and causing potential risks. These challenges include:

  1. Developing General Capabilities: Creating AI systems that can learn and adapt like humans, rather than just excel at narrow tasks.
  2. Assuring AI Performance: Ensuring AI systems behave reliably and as intended, even as they become more complex.
  3. Aligning AI Goals: Making sure the goals and objectives of AI systems are well-aligned with human values and priorities.
  4. Enabling Real-World AI: Developing AI technologies that can be effectively applied to solve real-world problems.
  5. Addressing Economic Disruption: Managing the economic upheaval that may be caused by the widespread adoption of AI.
  6. Ensuring Participation: Making sure the benefits and risks of AI are shared equitably across society.
  7. Responsible Deployment: Deploying AI in a socially responsible manner that mitigates potential harms.
  8. Addressing Geopolitical Impacts: Dealing with the geopolitical ramifications that could arise from the development of powerful AI.
  9. Promoting Governance: Establishing effective governance frameworks to guide the development and use of AI.
  10. Managing Philosophical Disruption: Grappling with the profound philosophical questions raised by the rise of AI.

For each of these challenges, the paper summarizes recent research efforts and suggests potential ways to make progress. The goal is to identify the key roadblocks to realizing the promise of AI while also addressing the risks it poses.

Technical Explanation

The paper presents a comprehensive overview of 10 "hard problems" that are currently impeding the full realization of AI's potential and contributing to AI risks. These problems span a range of technical, social, and philosophical domains.

For the first challenge, [object Object], the paper discusses the limitations of current AI systems in achieving human-like general intelligence and the need for more flexible and adaptable learning algorithms. Recent work in areas like meta-learning and self-supervised learning is highlighted as a potential way forward.

The second challenge, [object Object], focuses on ensuring the reliability, safety, and robustness of AI systems, especially as they become more complex. The paper reviews research on topics like AI testing, verification, and transparency to address these concerns.

The third challenge, [object Object], examines the critical task of ensuring AI systems' objectives and decision-making processes are well-aligned with human values and preferences. Approaches like inverse reinforcement learning and value learning are discussed as potential solutions.

The remaining challenges cover a range of socioeconomic, governance, and philosophical issues, such as [object Object], [Addressing Economic Disruption], [Ensuring Participation], [Responsible Deployment], [Addressing Geopolitical Impacts], [Promoting Governance], and [Managing Philosophical Disruption]. For each of these, the paper summarizes relevant research and proposes potential paths forward.

Critical Analysis

The paper provides a comprehensive and well-researched overview of the key challenges facing the field of AI, addressing both technical and non-technical barriers to the realization of AI's full potential. By outlining these "hard problems," the authors have identified critical areas that deserve ongoing attention and investment from the research community.

One potential limitation of the paper is that it may not delve deeply enough into the nuances and complexities of each challenge. While the authors provide a high-level summary of recent work and potential solutions, a more detailed exploration of the specific technical approaches, their tradeoffs, and the remaining open questions could be valuable for researchers and policymakers.

Additionally, the paper could have explored the interdependencies and interactions between the various problems more extensively. For instance, the challenge of [object Object] is closely tied to the challenges of [Responsible Deployment] and [Promoting Governance], and a more holistic examination of these interconnected issues could yield additional insights.

Nevertheless, the paper serves as an important and timely contribution to the ongoing discourse on the future of AI. By highlighting these critical challenges, the authors have provided a valuable roadmap for the research community and policymakers to focus their efforts on tackling the most pressing problems and realizing the transformative potential of AI while mitigating its risks.

Conclusion

The paper presents a comprehensive overview of 10 "hard problems" that are currently impeding the full realization of AI's potential and contributing to AI risks. These challenges span technical, social, economic, and philosophical domains, and the authors outline recent research efforts and potential ways forward for each.

By identifying and addressing these critical issues, the research community and policymakers can work towards developing AI systems that are more capable, reliable, and aligned with human values. This, in turn, will enable the deployment of transformative AI applications that can benefit society while mitigating the potential risks and disruptions associated with this rapidly evolving technology.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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