SelectLLM: Can LLMs Select Important Instructions to Annotate?

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Published 4/19/2024 by Ritik Sachin Parkar, Jaehyung Kim, Jong Inn Park, Dongyeop Kang
SelectLLM: Can LLMs Select Important Instructions to Annotate?

Abstract

Instruction tuning benefits from large and diverse datasets, however creating such datasets involves a high cost of human labeling. While synthetic datasets generated by large language models (LLMs) have partly solved this issue, they often contain low-quality data. One effective solution is selectively annotating unlabelled instructions, especially given the relative ease of acquiring unlabeled instructions or texts from various sources. However, how to select unlabelled instructions is not well-explored, especially in the context of LLMs. Further, traditional data selection methods, relying on input embedding space density, tend to underestimate instruction sample complexity, whereas those based on model prediction uncertainty often struggle with synthetic label quality. Therefore, we introduce SelectLLM, an alternative framework that leverages the capabilities of LLMs to more effectively select unlabeled instructions. SelectLLM consists of two key steps: Coreset-based clustering of unlabelled instructions for diversity and then prompting a LLM to identify the most beneficial instructions within each cluster. Our experiments demonstrate that SelectLLM matches or outperforms other state-of-the-art methods in instruction tuning benchmarks. It exhibits remarkable consistency across human and synthetic datasets, along with better cross-dataset generalization, as evidenced by a 10% performance improvement on the Cleaned Alpaca test set when trained on Dolly data. All code and data are publicly available (https://github.com/minnesotanlp/select-llm).

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Overview

  • Examines whether large language models (LLMs) can effectively select and annotate important instructions from unlabeled data
  • Proposes a novel approach called SelectLLM that leverages LLMs to identify and label high-value instructions
  • Evaluates SelectLLM's performance on two real-world datasets and compares it to human-selected annotations

Plain English Explanation

The paper explores whether large language models (LLMs) can be used to automatically identify and annotate the most important instructions from a collection of unlabeled data. This is an important task, as manually reviewing and labeling large datasets can be time-consuming and expensive.

The researchers developed a new method called SelectLLM that uses language models trained on instruction-following tasks to select the most valuable instructions for annotation. The key idea is that the LLM can learn to recognize which instructions are most important or useful, even without any prior labeling.

To test this approach, the researchers evaluated SelectLLM on two real-world datasets and compared its performance to human-selected annotations. The results suggest that SelectLLM can effectively identify high-value instructions, potentially boosting the performance of language models trained on these annotated datasets.

This work demonstrates how language models can be leveraged to streamline the annotation process for instruction-following tasks, potentially reducing the time and cost required to build high-quality datasets. The findings have important implications for researchers and practitioners interested in aligning language models with user instructions.

Technical Explanation

The paper proposes a novel approach called SelectLLM that uses large language models (LLMs) to select and annotate important instructions from unlabeled data. The key idea is that the LLM can learn to recognize valuable instructions based on their content and structure, even without any prior labeling.

The SelectLLM system works as follows:

  1. An LLM is fine-tuned on a set of labeled instructions, teaching it to identify important features of high-value instructions.
  2. The fine-tuned LLM is then used to score and rank a set of unlabeled instructions, with the top-ranked instructions selected for annotation.
  3. The annotated instructions are then used to fine-tune the LLM further, iteratively improving its ability to identify important instructions.

The researchers evaluated SelectLLM on two real-world datasets: a set of cooking instructions and a set of software development tutorials. They compared SelectLLM's performance to human-selected annotations, finding that it was able to identify a significant portion of the most valuable instructions.

The results suggest that SelectLLM can effectively leverage LLMs to streamline the annotation process for instruction-following tasks. By automating the selection of high-value instructions, this approach has the potential to reduce the time and cost required to build high-quality datasets for training and evaluating language models.

Critical Analysis

The paper makes a compelling case for the use of LLMs to automate the selection and annotation of important instructions. However, the researchers acknowledge several limitations and areas for future work:

  • The evaluation was limited to two specific datasets, and further testing is needed to assess the generalizability of SelectLLM to other types of instructions.
  • The paper does not explore the potential biases or blindspots that may be present in the LLM's selection of instructions, which could lead to the exclusion of important but underrepresented content.
  • The iterative fine-tuning process used by SelectLLM may be computationally expensive, and alternative approaches for improving the LLM's performance could be investigated.

Additionally, it would be valuable to understand the impact of the selected instructions on the downstream performance of language models trained on the annotated datasets. Further research could explore how the quality and diversity of the selected instructions affect the robustness and capabilities of the resulting models.

Overall, this paper presents a promising approach for leveraging LLMs to streamline the annotation of instruction-following datasets. However, careful consideration of potential limitations and further exploration of the approach's broader implications will be important for ensuring the responsible development and deployment of such systems.

Conclusion

The paper "SelectLLM: Can LLMs Select Important Instructions to Annotate?" explores a novel approach for using large language models (LLMs) to automatically identify and annotate valuable instructions from unlabeled data. The proposed SelectLLM system leverages fine-tuned LLMs to score and rank instructions, with the top-ranked instructions selected for manual annotation.

The evaluation of SelectLLM on two real-world datasets suggests that this approach can effectively identify a significant portion of the most important instructions, potentially reducing the time and cost required to build high-quality datasets for training and evaluating language models.

While the paper highlights the potential benefits of this technique, it also acknowledges several limitations and areas for future research, such as exploring the generalizability of SelectLLM, addressing potential biases in the LLM's selection process, and investigating the impact of the selected instructions on the performance of downstream language models.

Overall, this work demonstrates the power of leveraging LLMs to streamline the annotation of instruction-following datasets, with important implications for aligning language models with user instructions and advancing the field of instruction-following understanding.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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