The Psychosocial Impacts of Generative AI Harms

2405.01740

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Published 5/6/2024 by Faye-Marie Vassel, Evan Shieh, Cassidy R. Sugimoto, Thema Monroe-White

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Abstract

The rapid emergence of generative Language Models (LMs) has led to growing concern about the impacts that their unexamined adoption may have on the social well-being of diverse user groups. Meanwhile, LMs are increasingly being adopted in K-20 schools and one-on-one student settings with minimal investigation of potential harms associated with their deployment. Motivated in part by real-world/everyday use cases (e.g., an AI writing assistant) this paper explores the potential psychosocial harms of stories generated by five leading LMs in response to open-ended prompting. We extend findings of stereotyping harms analyzing a total of 150K 100-word stories related to student classroom interactions. Examining patterns in LM-generated character demographics and representational harms (i.e., erasure, subordination, and stereotyping) we highlight particularly egregious vignettes, illustrating the ways LM-generated outputs may influence the experiences of users with marginalized and minoritized identities, and emphasizing the need for a critical understanding of the psychosocial impacts of generative AI tools when deployed and utilized in diverse social contexts.

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Overview

  • This paper explores the potential psychosocial harms of stories generated by five leading language models (LMs) in response to open-ended prompts.
  • The researchers analyze a dataset of 150,000 100-word stories related to student classroom interactions, examining patterns in character demographics and representational harms (e.g., erasure, subordination, stereotyping).
  • The goal is to highlight how LM-generated outputs may influence the experiences of users with marginalized and minoritized identities, and to emphasize the need for a critical understanding of the psychosocial impacts of generative AI tools in diverse social contexts.

Plain English Explanation

As generative language models become more widely used, there is growing concern about the potential negative impacts on diverse user groups. This is especially true in education, where these models are being adopted in K-20 schools and one-on-one student settings with limited investigation into the possible harms.

In this study, the researchers wanted to understand how stories generated by five leading language models might affect the experiences of users with marginalized or minoritized identities. They created a dataset of 150,000 100-word stories about student classroom interactions and analyzed them for patterns in character demographics and representational harms, such as erasure, subordination, and stereotyping.

The researchers found concerning examples of how the language models' outputs could negatively impact the experiences of users from diverse backgrounds. This highlights the need for a critical understanding of the psychosocial impacts of generative AI tools, especially when they are used in educational and other social contexts.

Technical Explanation

The researchers used five leading language models (LMs) to generate 150,000 100-word stories in response to open-ended prompts related to student classroom interactions. They then analyzed the stories for patterns in character demographics and representational harms, such as erasure, subordination, and stereotyping.

The analysis revealed concerning examples of how the LM-generated outputs could negatively impact the experiences of users with marginalized and minoritized identities. For instance, certain stories may erase the presence of underrepresented groups, subordinate them to dominant groups, or reinforce harmful stereotypes.

The researchers argue that these findings highlight the need for a critical understanding of the psychosocial impacts of generative AI tools, particularly when they are deployed in educational and other social contexts where they may shape the experiences and perceptions of diverse user groups.

Critical Analysis

The paper provides a valuable exploration of the potential harms associated with the widespread adoption of generative language models, particularly in educational settings. The researchers acknowledge the limitations of their study, which focused on a specific set of prompts and language models, and call for further research to validate and expand on their findings.

One potential area for concern is the reliance on manual annotation to identify representational harms in the generated stories. While the researchers employed multiple annotators and established inter-rater reliability, there may be inherent biases or inconsistencies in this approach that could influence the results.

Additionally, the paper does not delve deeply into the technical mechanisms underlying the biases and harms observed in the LM-generated outputs. A more detailed analysis of the model architectures, training data, and other factors that contribute to these issues could provide valuable insights for developing mitigation strategies.

Overall, the research presented in this paper is an important step in understanding the societal impacts of generative AI and highlights the need for a more critical and comprehensive approach to the deployment of these technologies, particularly in sensitive domains like education.

Conclusion

This paper provides a thought-provoking exploration of the potential psychosocial harms associated with the widespread adoption of generative language models, especially in educational settings. The researchers analyze a large dataset of LM-generated stories and identify concerning patterns of representational harms that could negatively impact the experiences of users with marginalized and minoritized identities.

The findings underscore the need for a more critical and comprehensive understanding of the societal impacts of these technologies, as well as the development of mitigation strategies to ensure that generative AI tools are deployed in a responsible and equitable manner. As these technologies continue to evolve and become more integrated into our daily lives, it is crucial that we carefully consider their broader implications and work to address the potential harms they may pose to diverse user groups.



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