Practical Performance Guarantees for Pipelined DNN Inference

2311.03703

YC

2

Reddit

0

Published 5/6/2024 by Aaron Archer, Matthew Fahrbach, Kuikui Liu, Prakash Prabhu

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Abstract

We optimize pipeline parallelism for deep neural network (DNN) inference by partitioning model graphs into $k$ stages and minimizing the running time of the bottleneck stage, including communication. We give practical and effective algorithms for this NP-hard problem, but our emphasis is on tackling the practitioner's dilemma of deciding when a solution is good enough. To this end, we design novel mixed-integer programming (MIP) relaxations for proving lower bounds. Applying these methods to a diverse testbed of 369 production models, for $k in {2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64}$, we empirically show that these lower bounds are strong enough to be useful in practice. Our lower bounds are substantially stronger than standard combinatorial bounds. For example, evaluated via geometric means across our production testbed with $k = 16$ pipeline stages, our MIP formulations raised the lower bound from 0.4598 to 0.9452, expressed as a fraction of the best partition found. In other words, our improved lower bounds closed the optimality gap by a factor of 9.855x.

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Overview

  • The researchers present practical and effective algorithms to optimize pipeline parallelism for deep neural network (DNN) inference.
  • They partition DNN models into k stages and minimize the running time of the bottleneck stage, including communication.
  • The researchers focus on helping practitioners determine when a solution is good enough, designing novel mixed-integer programming (MIP) relaxations to prove lower bounds.
  • They evaluate their methods on a diverse testbed of 369 production models with k = 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, and 64 pipeline stages.

Plain English Explanation

The researchers have developed a way to make deep learning models run more efficiently on multiple processors. When running a deep learning model, the model is often split into different stages that can be processed in parallel. This is called pipeline parallelism. The researchers' goal is to partition the model into the optimal number of stages (k) to minimize the total processing time, including the time needed to communicate between stages.

This is a challenging optimization problem, so the researchers have designed new algorithms to find good solutions. Importantly, they focus on helping practitioners - the people actually using these models in real-world applications - decide when a solution is "good enough" and doesn't need further optimization.

To do this, the researchers develop novel mathematical programming techniques to calculate lower bounds on the optimal solution. These lower bounds help practitioners understand how close their current solution is to the best possible outcome. The researchers show that their new lower bound calculations are much tighter (i.e. closer to the optimal solution) than standard approaches, reducing the "optimality gap" by almost 10 times on average.

Technical Explanation

The core of the researchers' approach is to partition the DNN model graph into k stages and minimize the running time of the bottleneck stage, including communication overhead. This is a challenging NP-hard problem that the researchers tackle with practical and effective algorithms.

A key innovation is the design of novel mixed-integer programming (MIP) relaxations to prove tight lower bounds on the optimal solution. These bounds help practitioners understand how close their current solution is to the best possible partition.

The researchers evaluate their methods on a diverse testbed of 369 production DNN models, experimenting with k = 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, and 64 pipeline stages. They find that their MIP formulations substantially improve upon standard combinatorial lower bounds. For example, with k = 16 stages, the lower bound is raised from 0.4598 to 0.9452 as a fraction of the best partition found - a 9.855x improvement in the optimality gap.

This work builds on prior research in performance modeling for machine learning training and resource-aware DNN deployment, showing how careful algorithmic techniques can make DNN inference more efficient in practical settings.

Critical Analysis

The researchers acknowledge several limitations and areas for future work. First, their algorithms assume a static DNN model graph, whereas in practice models may be dynamically changing. Extensions to handle dynamic models would be valuable.

Additionally, the researchers focus only on minimizing the running time of the pipeline bottleneck. Other objectives, such as fairness across pipeline stages or energy efficiency, could also be important in real-world deployments. Exploring multi-objective optimization would be an interesting direction.

The testbed used in the experiments, while diverse, is limited to 369 production models. Evaluating the techniques on a broader range of models, including different DNN architectures and application domains, could provide further insights.

Finally, the researchers do not discuss the computational overhead of their MIP-based lower bound calculations. In practice, the time required to compute these bounds may be a limiting factor, especially for larger models or more pipeline stages. Developing more efficient bounding techniques would enhance the practicality of this approach.

Overall, this work makes valuable contributions to the challenge of efficient DNN inference, but there remain opportunities to extend the techniques to handle additional real-world complexities and constraints.

Conclusion

The researchers have developed practical algorithms to optimize pipeline parallelism for DNN inference, with a focus on helping practitioners determine when a solution is good enough. By designing novel MIP relaxations to prove tight lower bounds, they are able to substantially reduce the optimality gap compared to standard approaches.

This work advances the state of the art in DNN performance optimization, providing tools and insights that can benefit a wide range of practitioners deploying deep learning models in the real world. The researchers' emphasis on bridging the gap between theory and practice is particularly commendable and should serve as a model for future research in this domain.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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