Optimizing Language Model's Reasoning Abilities with Weak Supervision

2405.04086

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Published 5/8/2024 by Yongqi Tong, Sizhe Wang, Dawei Li, Yifan Wang, Simeng Han, Zi Lin, Chengsong Huang, Jiaxin Huang, Jingbo Shang

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Abstract

While Large Language Models (LLMs) have demonstrated proficiency in handling complex queries, much of the past work has depended on extensively annotated datasets by human experts. However, this reliance on fully-supervised annotations poses scalability challenges, particularly as models and data requirements grow. To mitigate this, we explore the potential of enhancing LLMs' reasoning abilities with minimal human supervision. In this work, we introduce self-reinforcement, which begins with Supervised Fine-Tuning (SFT) of the model using a small collection of annotated questions. Then it iteratively improves LLMs by learning from the differences in responses from the SFT and unfinetuned models on unlabeled questions. Our approach provides an efficient approach without relying heavily on extensive human-annotated explanations. However, current reasoning benchmarks typically only include golden-reference answers or rationales. Therefore, we present textsc{PuzzleBen}, a weakly supervised benchmark that comprises 25,147 complex questions, answers, and human-generated rationales across various domains, such as brainteasers, puzzles, riddles, parajumbles, and critical reasoning tasks. A unique aspect of our dataset is the inclusion of 10,000 unannotated questions, enabling us to explore utilizing fewer supersized data to boost LLMs' inference capabilities. Our experiments underscore the significance of textsc{PuzzleBen}, as well as the effectiveness of our methodology as a promising direction in future endeavors. Our dataset and code will be published soon on texttt{Anonymity Link}.

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Overview

  • Large Language Models (LLMs) have demonstrated impressive capabilities in handling complex queries, but they have traditionally relied on extensively annotated datasets created by human experts.
  • This reliance on fully-supervised annotations poses scalability challenges as models and data requirements grow.
  • To address this, the researchers explore enhancing LLMs' reasoning abilities with minimal human supervision, introducing a self-reinforcement approach.
  • They also present PuzzleBen, a weakly supervised benchmark with 25,147 complex questions, answers, and human-generated rationales across various domains.

Plain English Explanation

Large language models are incredibly powerful tools that can understand and respond to complex queries. However, these models have typically been trained using extensive datasets that have been carefully annotated by human experts. This reliance on fully-supervised data can be a significant challenge as the models and the data they require continue to grow in scale.

To address this issue, the researchers in this paper have explored a new approach called "self-reinforcement." This method starts by training the model using a small collection of annotated questions, a process known as Supervised Fine-Tuning (SFT). Then, the model is further improved by learning from the differences between its own responses and the responses of the unfinetuned model on unannotated questions.

This self-reinforcement approach allows the model to enhance its reasoning abilities without relying heavily on extensive human-provided explanations. This is an important step forward, as current reasoning benchmarks typically only include the correct answers or explanations, rather than the full range of questions and responses.

To address this, the researchers have also introduced a new dataset called PuzzleBen. This dataset includes 25,147 complex questions, answers, and human-generated rationales across a variety of domains, such as brainteasers, puzzles, riddles, and critical reasoning tasks. Importantly, the dataset also includes 10,000 unannotated questions, allowing the researchers to explore how fewer but larger datasets can be used to boost the inference capabilities of language models.

Overall, this research represents an exciting step forward in the development of more efficient and scalable language models that can reason and problem-solve with minimal human supervision.

Technical Explanation

The paper introduces a novel approach called "self-reinforcement" to enhance the reasoning abilities of Large Language Models (LLMs) with minimal human supervision. The method begins with Supervised Fine-Tuning (SFT) of the model using a small collection of annotated questions. It then iteratively improves the LLM by learning from the differences in responses between the SFT-trained model and the unfinetuned model on unlabeled questions.

This approach aims to address the scalability challenges posed by the reliance on extensively annotated datasets, which are typically required to train high-performing LLMs. By incorporating self-reinforcement, the model can learn to reason more effectively without the need for extensive human-provided explanations.

To facilitate this research, the authors also introduce PuzzleBen, a weakly supervised benchmark that comprises 25,147 complex questions, answers, and human-generated rationales across various domains, such as brainteasers, puzzles, riddles, parajumbles, and critical reasoning tasks. A unique aspect of this dataset is the inclusion of 10,000 unannotated questions, enabling the exploration of using fewer but larger datasets to boost LLMs' inference capabilities.

The experimental results presented in the paper underscore the significance of the PuzzleBen dataset and the effectiveness of the self-reinforcement methodology as a promising direction for future research in enhancing the reasoning abilities of large language models.

Critical Analysis

The paper presents a compelling approach to improving the reasoning capabilities of LLMs with minimal human supervision. The self-reinforcement method is an innovative way to leverage unlabeled data to enhance model performance, which could lead to more scalable and efficient language models.

However, the paper does not fully address the potential limitations of this approach. For instance, the researchers acknowledge that current reasoning benchmarks, including PuzzleBen, typically only include golden-reference answers or rationales, which may not capture the full spectrum of valid responses. Additionally, the paper does not discuss the potential risks or societal implications of deploying large language models with enhanced reasoning abilities, such as the potential for biased or harmful outputs.

Furthermore, the PuzzleBen dataset, while a valuable contribution, may not be representative of all types of reasoning tasks that LLMs may encounter in real-world applications. The researchers could consider expanding the dataset to include a more diverse range of reasoning challenges, such as those found in specific domains or contexts.

Despite these caveats, the research presented in this paper represents an important step forward in the development of more capable and efficient language models. By exploring self-reinforcement and introducing a novel benchmark, the authors have laid the groundwork for further advancements in this field.

Conclusion

This paper presents a novel approach called "self-reinforcement" to enhance the reasoning abilities of Large Language Models (LLMs) with minimal human supervision. By combining Supervised Fine-Tuning (SFT) with an iterative learning process that leverages unlabeled data, the researchers have developed a promising method for improving LLM performance without relying heavily on extensive human-annotated explanations.

To support this research, the authors have also introduced PuzzleBen, a weakly supervised benchmark that includes a diverse set of complex reasoning tasks. This dataset, with its inclusion of unannotated questions, enables the exploration of using fewer but larger datasets to boost LLMs' inference capabilities.

The findings in this paper underscore the significance of the PuzzleBen dataset and the effectiveness of the self-reinforcement methodology as a promising direction for future research in enhancing the reasoning abilities of large language models. As these models continue to grow in scale and complexity, developing more efficient and scalable training approaches will be crucial for their widespread adoption and real-world impact.



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