No Zero-Shot Without Exponential Data: Pretraining Concept Frequency Determines Multimodal Model Performance

2404.04125

YC

2

Reddit

316

Published 4/11/2024 by Vishaal Udandarao, Ameya Prabhu, Adhiraj Ghosh, Yash Sharma, Philip H. S. Torr, Adel Bibi, Samuel Albanie, Matthias Bethge
No Zero-Shot Without Exponential Data: Pretraining Concept Frequency Determines Multimodal Model Performance

Abstract

Web-crawled pretraining datasets underlie the impressive zero-shot evaluation performance of multimodal models, such as CLIP for classification/retrieval and Stable-Diffusion for image generation. However, it is unclear how meaningful the notion of zero-shot generalization is for such multimodal models, as it is not known to what extent their pretraining datasets encompass the downstream concepts targeted for during zero-shot evaluation. In this work, we ask: How is the performance of multimodal models on downstream concepts influenced by the frequency of these concepts in their pretraining datasets? We comprehensively investigate this question across 34 models and five standard pretraining datasets (CC-3M, CC-12M, YFCC-15M, LAION-400M, LAION-Aesthetics), generating over 300GB of data artifacts. We consistently find that, far from exhibiting zero-shot generalization, multimodal models require exponentially more data to achieve linear improvements in downstream zero-shot performance, following a sample inefficient log-linear scaling trend. This trend persists even when controlling for sample-level similarity between pretraining and downstream datasets, and testing on purely synthetic data distributions. Furthermore, upon benchmarking models on long-tailed data sampled based on our analysis, we demonstrate that multimodal models across the board perform poorly. We contribute this long-tail test set as the Let it Wag! benchmark to further research in this direction. Taken together, our study reveals an exponential need for training data which implies that the key to zero-shot generalization capabilities under large-scale training paradigms remains to be found.

Get summaries of the top AI research delivered straight to your inbox:

Overview

  • The paper examines the relationship between the frequency of concepts in pretraining data and the performance of multimodal models on zero-shot tasks.
  • It finds that models trained on data with a long-tailed distribution of concept frequencies struggle to learn rare concepts, limiting their zero-shot capabilities.
  • The authors propose that exponential growth in pretraining data is required for models to achieve strong zero-shot performance across a diverse range of concepts.

Plain English Explanation

The paper investigates how the distribution of concepts in the data used to train multimodal models affects their ability to perform well on "zero-shot" tasks. Zero-shot tasks are where the model has to understand and work with concepts it was not explicitly trained on.

The key finding is that if the training data has a "long-tailed" distribution - meaning there are many rare concepts and only a few very common ones - the models struggle to learn the rare concepts well. This limits their zero-shot capabilities, as they can only confidently handle the most frequent concepts they were exposed to during training.

The authors suggest that to overcome this, the amount of pretraining data would need to grow exponentially to cover a diverse range of increasingly rare concepts. This exponential growth in data is necessary for models to achieve strong zero-shot performance across a wide range of ideas and scenarios.

Technical Explanation

The paper examines how the frequency distribution of concepts in pretraining data impacts the zero-shot performance of multimodal models. [The authors build on prior research like Multi-Stage Multi-Modal Pre-Training, Diverse Tailored Image Generation, and LLM Meets Vision Language Models.]

They find that when the pretraining data has a long-tailed distribution of concept frequencies - with many rare concepts and few very common ones - the models struggle to learn the rare concepts well. This limits their ability to perform well on zero-shot tasks involving those rare concepts, as they can only confidently handle the most frequent ideas they were exposed to during training.

[The authors build on prior work like Improved Zero-Shot Classification and Zero-Few Shot Prompting to further explore the challenges of zero-shot learning.]

The paper suggests that exponential growth in pretraining data is required for models to achieve strong zero-shot performance across a diverse range of concepts. This substantial increase in data coverage is necessary to overcome the inherent biases introduced by long-tailed frequency distributions.

Critical Analysis

The paper provides a clear and well-supported argument for the limitations of current multimodal models in zero-shot tasks. The authors acknowledge that their findings are constrained by the specific datasets and model architectures they evaluated, and they encourage further research to validate the generalizability of their conclusions.

One potential limitation not directly addressed is the feasibility of exponentially scaling pretraining data. Gathering and curating such vast amounts of high-quality, diverse data may be logistically and financially challenging, even for large tech companies and research labs. The paper could have discussed potential strategies or considerations for overcoming such practical obstacles.

Additionally, the paper does not explore potential alternative approaches beyond simply increasing data quantity. There may be architectural innovations, training techniques, or other advancements that could help mitigate the impact of long-tailed frequency distributions without the need for exponential data growth. Investigating such possibilities could open up new research directions.

Overall, the paper offers a thought-provoking analysis and a clear path forward for improving the zero-shot capabilities of multimodal models. Encouraging readers to think critically about the limitations and consider additional research avenues would further strengthen the impact of this work.

Conclusion

This paper highlights a fundamental challenge facing multimodal models in achieving strong zero-shot performance: the frequency distribution of concepts in the pretraining data. When this distribution is long-tailed, with many rare concepts and few very common ones, the models struggle to learn the rare concepts well, limiting their zero-shot capabilities.

The authors propose that exponential growth in pretraining data is necessary to overcome this limitation and enable multimodal models to perform well on zero-shot tasks across a diverse range of concepts. This insight could guide future research and development efforts in the field of multimodal AI, as the community works to create models with more flexible and generalizable capabilities.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

Related Papers

Audio-Visual Generalized Zero-Shot Learning using Pre-Trained Large Multi-Modal Models

Audio-Visual Generalized Zero-Shot Learning using Pre-Trained Large Multi-Modal Models

David Kurzendorfer, Otniel-Bogdan Mercea, A. Sophia Koepke, Zeynep Akata

YC

0

Reddit

0

Audio-visual zero-shot learning methods commonly build on features extracted from pre-trained models, e.g. video or audio classification models. However, existing benchmarks predate the popularization of large multi-modal models, such as CLIP and CLAP. In this work, we explore such large pre-trained models to obtain features, i.e. CLIP for visual features, and CLAP for audio features. Furthermore, the CLIP and CLAP text encoders provide class label embeddings which are combined to boost the performance of the system. We propose a simple yet effective model that only relies on feed-forward neural networks, exploiting the strong generalization capabilities of the new audio, visual and textual features. Our framework achieves state-of-the-art performance on VGGSound-GZSL, UCF-GZSL, and ActivityNet-GZSL with our new features. Code and data available at: https://github.com/dkurzend/ClipClap-GZSL.

Read more

4/10/2024

πŸ€”

MM1: Methods, Analysis & Insights from Multimodal LLM Pre-training

Brandon McKinzie, Zhe Gan, Jean-Philippe Fauconnier, Sam Dodge, Bowen Zhang, Philipp Dufter, Dhruti Shah, Xianzhi Du, Futang Peng, Floris Weers, Anton Belyi, Haotian Zhang, Karanjeet Singh, Doug Kang, Ankur Jain, Hongyu H`e, Max Schwarzer, Tom Gunter, Xiang Kong, Aonan Zhang, Jianyu Wang, Chong Wang, Nan Du, Tao Lei, Sam Wiseman, Guoli Yin, Mark Lee, Zirui Wang, Ruoming Pang, Peter Grasch, Alexander Toshev, Yinfei Yang

YC

0

Reddit

0

In this work, we discuss building performant Multimodal Large Language Models (MLLMs). In particular, we study the importance of various architecture components and data choices. Through careful and comprehensive ablations of the image encoder, the vision language connector, and various pre-training data choices, we identified several crucial design lessons. For example, we demonstrate that for large-scale multimodal pre-training using a careful mix of image-caption, interleaved image-text, and text-only data is crucial for achieving state-of-the-art (SOTA) few-shot results across multiple benchmarks, compared to other published pre-training results. Further, we show that the image encoder together with image resolution and the image token count has substantial impact, while the vision-language connector design is of comparatively negligible importance. By scaling up the presented recipe, we build MM1, a family of multimodal models up to 30B parameters, including both dense models and mixture-of-experts (MoE) variants, that are SOTA in pre-training metrics and achieve competitive performance after supervised fine-tuning on a range of established multimodal benchmarks. Thanks to large-scale pre-training, MM1 enjoys appealing properties such as enhanced in-context learning, and multi-image reasoning, enabling few-shot chain-of-thought prompting.

Read more

4/22/2024

Data Alignment for Zero-Shot Concept Generation in Dermatology AI

Data Alignment for Zero-Shot Concept Generation in Dermatology AI

Soham Gadgil, Mahtab Bigverdi

YC

0

Reddit

0

AI in dermatology is evolving at a rapid pace but the major limitation to training trustworthy classifiers is the scarcity of data with ground-truth concept level labels, which are meta-labels semantically meaningful to humans. Foundation models like CLIP providing zero-shot capabilities can help alleviate this challenge by leveraging vast amounts of image-caption pairs available on the internet. CLIP can be fine-tuned using domain specific image-caption pairs to improve classification performance. However, CLIP's pre-training data is not well-aligned with the medical jargon that clinicians use to perform diagnoses. The development of large language models (LLMs) in recent years has led to the possibility of leveraging the expressive nature of these models to generate rich text. Our goal is to use these models to generate caption text that aligns well with both the clinical lexicon and with the natural human language used in CLIP's pre-training data. Starting with captions used for images in PubMed articles, we extend them by passing the raw captions through an LLM fine-tuned on the field's several textbooks. We find that using captions generated by an expressive fine-tuned LLM like GPT-3.5 improves downstream zero-shot concept classification performance.

Read more

4/22/2024

Multi-Stage Multi-Modal Pre-Training for Automatic Speech Recognition

Multi-Stage Multi-Modal Pre-Training for Automatic Speech Recognition

Yash Jain, David Chan, Pranav Dheram, Aparna Khare, Olabanji Shonibare, Venkatesh Ravichandran, Shalini Ghosh

YC

0

Reddit

0

Recent advances in machine learning have demonstrated that multi-modal pre-training can improve automatic speech recognition (ASR) performance compared to randomly initialized models, even when models are fine-tuned on uni-modal tasks. Existing multi-modal pre-training methods for the ASR task have primarily focused on single-stage pre-training where a single unsupervised task is used for pre-training followed by fine-tuning on the downstream task. In this work, we introduce a novel method combining multi-modal and multi-task unsupervised pre-training with a translation-based supervised mid-training approach. We empirically demonstrate that such a multi-stage approach leads to relative word error rate (WER) improvements of up to 38.45% over baselines on both Librispeech and SUPERB. Additionally, we share several important findings for choosing pre-training methods and datasets.

Read more

4/1/2024