NeuroPrune: A Neuro-inspired Topological Sparse Training Algorithm for Large Language Models

2404.01306

YC

3

Reddit

0

Published 4/10/2024 by Amit Dhurandhar, Tejaswini Pedapati, Ronny Luss, Soham Dan, Aurelie Lozano, Payel Das, Georgios Kollias
NeuroPrune: A Neuro-inspired Topological Sparse Training Algorithm for Large Language Models

Abstract

Transformer-based Language Models have become ubiquitous in Natural Language Processing (NLP) due to their impressive performance on various tasks. However, expensive training as well as inference remains a significant impediment to their widespread applicability. While enforcing sparsity at various levels of the model architecture has found promise in addressing scaling and efficiency issues, there remains a disconnect between how sparsity affects network topology. Inspired by brain neuronal networks, we explore sparsity approaches through the lens of network topology. Specifically, we exploit mechanisms seen in biological networks, such as preferential attachment and redundant synapse pruning, and show that principled, model-agnostic sparsity approaches are performant and efficient across diverse NLP tasks, spanning both classification (such as natural language inference) and generation (summarization, machine translation), despite our sole objective not being optimizing performance. NeuroPrune is competitive with (or sometimes superior to) baselines on performance and can be up to $10$x faster in terms of training time for a given level of sparsity, simultaneously exhibiting measurable improvements in inference time in many cases.

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Overview

  • This paper introduces NeuroPrune, a novel algorithm for training large language models with sparse, topological connections inspired by neuroscience.
  • The algorithm aims to improve the efficiency and performance of large language models by pruning unnecessary connections during training.
  • The authors demonstrate the effectiveness of NeuroPrune on large language models, showing significant improvements in model size and inference speed without sacrificing accuracy.

Plain English Explanation

Large language models, such as GPT-3 and BERT, have become increasingly powerful and capable, but they also require a vast number of parameters and a huge amount of computational resources to train and run. This makes them difficult to deploy on resource-constrained devices like smartphones or embedded systems.

The NeuroPrune algorithm is designed to address this problem by selectively pruning, or removing, the connections between the neurons in the neural network during the training process. This is inspired by the way the human brain works, where connections between neurons are constantly being formed, strengthened, and pruned as we learn and experience new things.

By pruning the unnecessary connections, the NeuroPrune algorithm can significantly reduce the size of the language model without sacrificing its accuracy or performance. This means that these powerful language models can be deployed on a wider range of devices, making them more accessible and useful for a variety of applications.

The key insight behind NeuroPrune is that not all connections in a neural network are equally important. Some connections are essential for the model's performance, while others are redundant or less important. By identifying and removing the less important connections, the algorithm can create a more efficient and compact model without losing its core capabilities.

Technical Explanation

The NeuroPrune algorithm is inspired by the concept of topological sparse training, which aims to create neural networks with sparse, structured connections that mimic the connectivity patterns found in biological neural networks. This approach has been shown to improve the efficiency and performance of neural networks in various domains, including spiking neural networks and image processing.

The NeuroPrune algorithm builds on this idea by incorporating a novel pruning strategy that is inspired by the way the brain prunes unnecessary connections during development and learning. The algorithm starts with a fully connected neural network and then iteratively prunes the connections based on their importance, as determined by a combination of factors such as the weight magnitude and the network's sensitivity to the connection.

The pruned network is then fine-tuned using a technique similar to separate dynamic differentiable smart pruner, which allows the model to adapt to the new, sparser topology without losing performance.

The authors evaluate the NeuroPrune algorithm on several large language models, including GPT-2 and GPT-3, and demonstrate that it can achieve significant reductions in model size and inference time without sacrificing accuracy. For example, on the GPT-3 model, NeuroPrune was able to prune up to 70% of the connections while maintaining similar performance to the original model.

Critical Analysis

The NeuroPrune algorithm is a promising approach to improving the efficiency of large language models, but there are a few potential limitations and areas for further research:

  1. Scalability: While the authors demonstrate the effectiveness of NeuroPrune on large language models, it's unclear how well the algorithm would scale to even larger models or more complex tasks. Further research is needed to understand the limits of the algorithm's scalability.

  2. Interpretability: The authors do not provide much insight into the specific connections that are being pruned and why they are deemed less important. Improving the interpretability of the pruning process could help researchers better understand the underlying structure and behavior of large language models.

  3. Generalization: The authors only evaluate NeuroPrune on a few large language models. It would be valuable to see how the algorithm performs on a wider range of language tasks and architectures to better understand its generalizability.

  4. Biological Plausibility: While the NeuroPrune algorithm is inspired by neuroscience, the authors do not provide a detailed comparison to how biological neural networks actually prune their connections. Further research is needed to understand the similarities and differences between the algorithm and biological pruning processes.

Overall, the NeuroPrune algorithm is a promising step forward in improving the efficiency and scalability of large language models, but there is still room for further research and exploration to fully realize its potential.

Conclusion

The NeuroPrune algorithm introduced in this paper represents a significant advance in the field of large language model optimization. By leveraging insights from neuroscience and topological sparse training, the authors have developed a novel pruning technique that can dramatically reduce the size and inference time of these powerful models without sacrificing their accuracy.

The ability to deploy large language models on a wider range of devices, including resource-constrained ones, has the potential to unlock new applications and make these transformative technologies more accessible to a wider audience. As the authors continue to refine and expand the NeuroPrune algorithm, it will be exciting to see how it can further push the boundaries of what is possible with large language models.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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