Neural-Symbolic VideoQA: Learning Compositional Spatio-Temporal Reasoning for Real-world Video Question Answering

2404.04007

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Published 4/8/2024 by Lili Liang, Guanglu Sun, Jin Qiu, Lizhong Zhang
Neural-Symbolic VideoQA: Learning Compositional Spatio-Temporal Reasoning for Real-world Video Question Answering

Abstract

Compositional spatio-temporal reasoning poses a significant challenge in the field of video question answering (VideoQA). Existing approaches struggle to establish effective symbolic reasoning structures, which are crucial for answering compositional spatio-temporal questions. To address this challenge, we propose a neural-symbolic framework called Neural-Symbolic VideoQA (NS-VideoQA), specifically designed for real-world VideoQA tasks. The uniqueness and superiority of NS-VideoQA are two-fold: 1) It proposes a Scene Parser Network (SPN) to transform static-dynamic video scenes into Symbolic Representation (SR), structuralizing persons, objects, relations, and action chronologies. 2) A Symbolic Reasoning Machine (SRM) is designed for top-down question decompositions and bottom-up compositional reasonings. Specifically, a polymorphic program executor is constructed for internally consistent reasoning from SR to the final answer. As a result, Our NS-VideoQA not only improves the compositional spatio-temporal reasoning in real-world VideoQA task, but also enables step-by-step error analysis by tracing the intermediate results. Experimental evaluations on the AGQA Decomp benchmark demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed NS-VideoQA framework. Empirical studies further confirm that NS-VideoQA exhibits internal consistency in answering compositional questions and significantly improves the capability of spatio-temporal and logical inference for VideoQA tasks.

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Overview

  • This paper proposes a novel neural-symbolic approach for video question answering (VideoQA) called Neural-Symbolic VideoQA.
  • The key idea is to combine the strengths of deep learning and symbolic reasoning to enable more compositional and generalizable video understanding for real-world VideoQA tasks.
  • The model learns to decompose questions into sub-tasks, reason about them through a neural network, and then aggregate the results using a symbolic reasoner.

Plain English Explanation

The paper presents a new way to approach the problem of answering questions about videos. Current video question answering (VideoQA) systems often struggle with complex, multi-part questions that require deep reasoning about the content of the video. The researchers behind this work believe that combining neural networks (which are good at learning from data) with symbolic reasoning (which is good at logical inference) can lead to more powerful and generalizable VideoQA models.

The core idea is to break down questions into smaller, more manageable sub-tasks that the neural network can handle. For example, if asked "What color is the car and how many people are in the video?", the system would first use a neural network to identify the color of the car, then use a separate module to count the number of people. These individual results would then be combined using a symbolic reasoner to produce the final answer.

By decomposing the reasoning process in this way, the researchers hope to create VideoQA systems that are more compositional (able to handle complex questions by breaking them down) and generalizable (able to apply the learned reasoning skills to new videos and questions, rather than just memorizing patterns). This could lead to significant improvements in the real-world performance of VideoQA technology.

Technical Explanation

The paper introduces a Neural-Symbolic VideoQA model that leverages both deep learning and symbolic reasoning to address the limitations of existing transformer-based VideoQA approaches.

The key components of the model are:

  1. Question Decomposition: The system first analyzes the input question and breaks it down into a set of sub-tasks, such as identifying objects, counting people, or recognizing actions.

  2. Neural Reasoning: For each sub-task, a neural network module is used to extract relevant information from the video and produce an intermediate result, such as the color of a car or the number of people.

  3. Symbolic Aggregation: A symbolic reasoner then takes the outputs of the neural modules and combines them using logical rules to produce the final answer to the original question.

The researchers evaluate their approach on several real-world VideoQA datasets and show that it outperforms state-of-the-art transformer-based models, particularly on questions that require complex, compositional reasoning. They also demonstrate the model's ability to generalize to new videos and questions better than previous methods.

Critical Analysis

The Neural-Symbolic VideoQA approach presented in this paper is a promising step towards more robust and generalizable video understanding for question answering. By explicitly modeling the compositional nature of complex questions, the system is able to better handle the diversity and nuance of real-world VideoQA tasks.

However, the paper does not address the potential limitations of the symbolic reasoning component, such as its reliance on predefined rules and the difficulty of scaling to large, open-ended knowledge bases. Additionally, the model's performance on more open-ended, free-form questions is not thoroughly explored, and the paper does not discuss potential biases or failures modes of the system.

Further research is needed to fully understand the strengths and weaknesses of this neural-symbolic approach, as well as to explore ways to improve the compositionality and generalization of VideoQA models more broadly. Comparisons to other emerging approaches, such as learning-based reasoning or multi-modal question answering, would also help situate the contributions of this work within the larger context of video understanding research.

Conclusion

The Neural-Symbolic VideoQA model presented in this paper represents an important step towards more robust and generalizable video question answering. By combining the strengths of deep learning and symbolic reasoning, the system is able to better handle the complexity and diversity of real-world VideoQA tasks, particularly those that require compositional, multi-step reasoning.

While the paper does not address all the potential limitations of this approach, it demonstrates the value of integrating different AI paradigms to tackle challenging problems in video understanding. As the field of VideoQA continues to evolve, this work highlights the importance of exploring hybrid architectures and the potential benefits they can bring to real-world applications.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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