Learning Performance-Improving Code Edits

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Published 4/29/2024 by Alexander Shypula, Aman Madaan, Yimeng Zeng, Uri Alon, Jacob Gardner, Milad Hashemi, Graham Neubig, Parthasarathy Ranganathan, Osbert Bastani, Amir Yazdanbakhsh

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Abstract

With the decline of Moore's law, optimizing program performance has become a major focus of software research. However, high-level optimizations such as API and algorithm changes remain elusive due to the difficulty of understanding the semantics of code. Simultaneously, pretrained large language models (LLMs) have demonstrated strong capabilities at solving a wide range of programming tasks. To that end, we introduce a framework for adapting LLMs to high-level program optimization. First, we curate a dataset of performance-improving edits made by human programmers of over 77,000 competitive C++ programming submission pairs, accompanied by extensive unit tests. A major challenge is the significant variability of measuring performance on commodity hardware, which can lead to spurious improvements. To isolate and reliably evaluate the impact of program optimizations, we design an environment based on the gem5 full system simulator, the de facto simulator used in academia and industry. Next, we propose a broad range of adaptation strategies for code optimization; for prompting, these include retrieval-based few-shot prompting and chain-of-thought, and for finetuning, these include performance-conditioned generation and synthetic data augmentation based on self-play. A combination of these techniques achieves a mean speedup of 6.86 with eight generations, higher than average optimizations from individual programmers (3.66). Using our model's fastest generations, we set a new upper limit on the fastest speedup possible for our dataset at 9.64 compared to using the fastest human submissions available (9.56).

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Overview

  • As Moore's Law slows, improving software performance has become a major focus in computer science research.
  • However, making high-level optimizations like changing APIs or algorithms is challenging due to the difficulty of understanding code semantics.
  • Large language models (LLMs) have shown impressive abilities at solving various programming tasks.
  • This paper introduces a framework for adapting LLMs to optimize program performance at a high level.

Plain English Explanation

The paper describes a novel approach to using large language models to improve the performance of computer programs. In the past, performance optimization has typically relied on making low-level changes to a program's code, such as tweaking individual lines or functions. However, this can be time-consuming and difficult, especially for complex programs.

The researchers behind this paper propose a different strategy. They use an LLM, a type of AI model that can understand and generate human-like text, to make higher-level optimizations to the program. For example, the LLM might suggest changing the algorithm used in a certain part of the code, or refactoring the API to be more efficient.

To test this approach, the researchers created a dataset of over 77,000 pairs of programming submissions, where one submission in each pair had been optimized by a human programmer to run faster. They then trained the LLM on this dataset, using a variety of techniques like few-shot prompting and synthetic data augmentation.

The results are promising - the LLM-based optimizations achieved an average speedup of 6.86, which is better than the average speedup from human programmers (3.66). In some cases, the LLM-generated optimizations even outperformed the fastest human-made optimizations in the dataset.

Technical Explanation

The paper introduces a framework for adapting large language models (LLMs) to perform high-level program optimizations. The researchers first curated a dataset of over 77,000 pairs of competitive C++ programming submissions, where one submission in each pair had been optimized by a human programmer to run faster. This dataset, along with extensive unit tests, serves as the training data for the LLM-based optimization system.

A key challenge in evaluating program optimizations is the significant variability in performance measurements on commodity hardware, which can lead to spurious improvements. To address this, the researchers designed an environment based on the gem5 full system simulator, a widely-used tool in academia and industry for reliable performance evaluation.

The paper explores a range of adaptation strategies for the LLM, including retrieval-based few-shot prompting, chain-of-thought prompting, performance-conditioned generation, and synthetic data augmentation based on self-play. A combination of these techniques achieves a mean speedup of 6.86, higher than the average optimization from individual programmers (3.66).

Furthermore, the researchers were able to set a new upper limit on the fastest possible speedup for their dataset at 9.64, using the fastest generations from their LLM-based system, compared to 9.56 for the fastest human submissions.

Critical Analysis

The paper presents a novel and promising approach to program optimization using large language models. By leveraging a curated dataset of human-made optimizations and a robust performance evaluation environment, the researchers have demonstrated the potential for LLMs to outperform individual programmers in high-level code optimization tasks.

One potential limitation of the research is the focus on a specific programming language (C++) and the use of a simulator-based evaluation environment. While this approach allows for reliable performance measurement, it may not fully capture the complexities of real-world software development and deployment. Further research is needed to explore the generalization of this approach to other programming languages and real-world software systems.

Additionally, the paper does not provide a detailed analysis of the types of optimizations the LLM is able to generate, nor does it explore the interpretability and explainability of the LLM's decision-making process. Understanding the specific mechanisms and reasoning behind the LLM's optimization decisions could be valuable for both practical application and further research in this area.

Despite these potential limitations, the paper represents an important step forward in the field of program optimization and the application of large language models to complex software engineering tasks. The researchers have demonstrated the feasibility of this approach and have laid the groundwork for future studies to build upon.

Conclusion

This paper presents a promising framework for using large language models to perform high-level program optimizations, which can achieve better results than individual human programmers. By curating a dataset of human-made optimizations and designing a robust performance evaluation environment, the researchers have shown the potential for LLMs to generate optimizations that outperform the fastest human submissions.

While there are still some limitations to address, this work represents a significant advancement in the field of program optimization and the application of large language models to complex software engineering problems. As Moore's Law continues to slow, the ability to efficiently optimize program performance at a high level will become increasingly crucial, and the approach presented in this paper could be a valuable tool in addressing this challenge.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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