Large Language Models Can Infer Personality from Free-Form User Interactions

2405.13052

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Published 5/24/2024 by Heinrich Peters, Moran Cerf, Sandra C. Matz

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Abstract

This study investigates the capacity of Large Language Models (LLMs) to infer the Big Five personality traits from free-form user interactions. The results demonstrate that a chatbot powered by GPT-4 can infer personality with moderate accuracy, outperforming previous approaches drawing inferences from static text content. The accuracy of inferences varied across different conversational settings. Performance was highest when the chatbot was prompted to elicit personality-relevant information from users (mean r=.443, range=[.245, .640]), followed by a condition placing greater emphasis on naturalistic interaction (mean r=.218, range=[.066, .373]). Notably, the direct focus on personality assessment did not result in a less positive user experience, with participants reporting the interactions to be equally natural, pleasant, engaging, and humanlike across both conditions. A chatbot mimicking ChatGPT's default behavior of acting as a helpful assistant led to markedly inferior personality inferences and lower user experience ratings but still captured psychologically meaningful information for some of the personality traits (mean r=.117, range=[-.004, .209]). Preliminary analyses suggest that the accuracy of personality inferences varies only marginally across different socio-demographic subgroups. Our results highlight the potential of LLMs for psychological profiling based on conversational interactions. We discuss practical implications and ethical challenges associated with these findings.

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Overview

  • This study investigates the ability of Large Language Models (LLMs) to infer people's personality traits based on their conversations with a chatbot.
  • The results show that an LLM-powered chatbot can make moderate-accuracy personality inferences, outperforming previous approaches that relied on static text content.
  • The accuracy of the inferences varied depending on the conversational setting, with the highest performance when the chatbot was prompted to elicit personality-relevant information.
  • Interestingly, this more direct focus on personality assessment did not negatively impact the user experience, which remained positive across different conditions.

Plain English Explanation

The researchers wanted to see if a chatbot powered by a powerful AI language model, like GPT-4, could figure out someone's personality just by talking to them. Previous methods tried to guess personality based on what people wrote, but the chatbot was able to do a better job.

The chatbot performed best when it was specifically told to ask questions to learn about the person's personality. Even though it was focusing on personality, the people chatting with the bot still found the conversation to be natural, pleasant, and human-like. When the chatbot just acted like a regular helpful assistant, it was not as good at guessing personality, but it still captured some useful information.

The accuracy of the personality guesses didn't vary much based on the person's age, gender, or other demographic factors. This shows the potential for these AI language models to do psychological profiling by analyzing how people communicate. However, there are also important ethical questions to consider around the use of this technology.

Technical Explanation

This study investigates the capability of Large Language Models (LLMs) to infer the Big Five personality traits (openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism) from free-form conversational interactions. The researchers developed a chatbot powered by GPT-4 and tested its performance across three different conversational settings:

  1. A "Personality Inference" condition where the chatbot was prompted to elicit personality-relevant information from users.
  2. A "Naturalistic Interaction" condition that placed greater emphasis on natural conversation flow.
  3. A "Helpful Assistant" condition mirroring the default behavior of language models like ChatGPT.

The results show that the chatbot was able to make moderately accurate personality inferences, with the highest performance in the "Personality Inference" condition (mean r=.443). The "Naturalistic Interaction" condition also yielded meaningful personality insights (mean r=.218), while the "Helpful Assistant" condition had the lowest accuracy (mean r=.117).

Importantly, the more targeted focus on personality assessment in the first condition did not negatively impact the user experience, which remained equally positive across all settings. The researchers also found that the accuracy of the personality inferences was relatively consistent across different socio-demographic subgroups.

Critical Analysis

The study demonstrates the potential of LLMs to simulate human-like social interactions and infer psychological information from conversational data. However, it also raises important ethical questions about the use of such technology for psychological profiling, particularly in the context of dynamic personality generation by AI systems.

While the study acknowledges some limitations, such as the use of a relatively small sample size, it would be valuable to see further research exploring the long-term implications and potential misuses of this technology. Additional studies could investigate the robustness of the personality inferences, the impact of different conversational contexts, and the potential for bias or manipulation in these AI-driven interactions.

Conclusion

This study demonstrates the promising yet complex relationship between Large Language Models and human personality. While the results suggest that LLMs can make moderately accurate personality inferences from conversational data, the ethical implications of this capability deserve careful consideration. As these technologies continue to advance, it will be crucial to explore ways of harnessing their potential while addressing the risks and challenges they present for individual privacy, psychological well-being, and societal trust.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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