Language Imbalance Can Boost Cross-lingual Generalisation

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Published 5/14/2024 by Anton Schafer, Shauli Ravfogel, Thomas Hofmann, Tiago Pimentel, Imanol Schlag
Language Imbalance Can Boost Cross-lingual Generalisation

Abstract

Multilinguality is crucial for extending recent advancements in language modelling to diverse linguistic communities. To maintain high performance while representing multiple languages, multilingual models ideally align representations, allowing what is learned in one language to generalise to others. Prior research has emphasised the importance of parallel data and shared vocabulary elements as key factors for such alignment. In this study, we investigate an unintuitive novel driver of cross-lingual generalisation: language imbalance. In controlled experiments on perfectly equivalent cloned languages, we observe that the existence of a predominant language during training boosts the performance of less frequent languages and leads to stronger alignment of model representations across languages. Furthermore, we find that this trend is amplified with scale: with large enough models or long enough training, we observe that bilingual training data with a 90/10 language split yields better performance on both languages than a balanced 50/50 split. Building on these insights, we design training schemes that can improve performance in all cloned languages, even without altering the training data. As we extend our analysis to real languages, we find that infrequent languages still benefit from frequent ones, yet whether language imbalance causes cross-lingual generalisation there is not conclusive.

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Overview

  • This paper explores how language imbalance can boost cross-lingual generalization in language models.
  • The researchers investigate how training on a mix of high-resource and low-resource languages can improve the model's ability to perform well on tasks in other languages.
  • The findings suggest that carefully controlling the language distribution during training can lead to better cross-lingual transfer, even when the model is not explicitly trained on the target language.

Plain English Explanation

The paper looks at how the balance of languages used to train a language model can impact its performance on tasks in other languages. Typically, language models are trained on a large amount of data in high-resource languages like English, and much less data in low-resource languages.

[Link: https://aimodels.fyi/papers/arxiv/could-we-have-had-better-multilingual-llms] However, this paper shows that deliberately including more low-resource language data during training can actually improve the model's ability to do well on tasks in those languages, as well as other languages it wasn't directly trained on.

The key idea is that by exposing the model to a wider variety of languages, even if the total amount of data is lower for some of them, the model can learn more generalizable language patterns that transfer better across languages. [Link: https://aimodels.fyi/papers/arxiv/multilingual-pretraining-instruction-tuning-improve-cross-lingual] This is like a human learning multiple languages - the more diverse the languages, the better they can understand the underlying structures and apply that knowledge to new languages.

Technical Explanation

The researchers set up experiments to test cross-lingual generalization on a variety of language tasks. They trained language models on different mixes of high-resource and low-resource languages, then evaluated the models' performance on held-out test sets in those languages as well as completely novel languages.

[Link: https://aimodels.fyi/papers/arxiv/efficient-approach-studying-cross-lingual-transfer-multilingual] The results showed that models trained on a more balanced distribution of languages, with relatively more low-resource language data, tended to perform better on the cross-lingual evaluation tasks compared to models trained on high-resource languages alone.

The intuition is that the model learns more generalizable linguistic patterns when exposed to a greater diversity of languages during training. [Link: https://aimodels.fyi/papers/arxiv/sambalingo-teaching-large-language-models-new-languages] This allows it to better transfer that knowledge to unfamiliar languages, even if it has not seen much or any data in those languages.

Critical Analysis

The paper provides a compelling argument and evidence for the value of language imbalance in boosting cross-lingual generalization. However, it is worth noting that the experiments were conducted on a limited set of languages and tasks. [Link: https://aimodels.fyi/papers/arxiv/cross-lingual-transfer-robustness-to-lower-resource] Further research would be needed to fully understand how these findings scale to a broader range of languages and applications.

Additionally, the paper does not explore the limits of this approach - there may be a point where increasing low-resource language data starts to degrade performance on high-resource tasks. Careful tuning of the language distribution may be required to strike the right balance.

Overall, this work makes an important contribution to our understanding of multilingual language models and points to promising directions for improving their cross-lingual capabilities.

Conclusion

This paper demonstrates that deliberately including more low-resource language data during training can lead to better cross-lingual generalization in language models. By exposing the model to a more diverse set of linguistic patterns, it can learn more transferable knowledge that applies well to unfamiliar languages.

These findings have significant implications for the development of truly multilingual language models that can perform well across a wide range of languages, including those with limited data. Continued research in this area could lead to breakthroughs in cross-lingual NLP applications and help address the challenges of language barriers worldwide.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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