Language Agent Tree Search Unifies Reasoning Acting and Planning in Language Models

2310.04406

YC

79

Reddit

0

Published 6/7/2024 by Andy Zhou, Kai Yan, Michal Shlapentokh-Rothman, Haohan Wang, Yu-Xiong Wang
Language Agent Tree Search Unifies Reasoning Acting and Planning in Language Models

Abstract

While language models (LMs) have shown potential across a range of decision-making tasks, their reliance on simple acting processes limits their broad deployment as autonomous agents. In this paper, we introduce Language Agent Tree Search (LATS) -- the first general framework that synergizes the capabilities of LMs in reasoning, acting, and planning. By leveraging the in-context learning ability of LMs, we integrate Monte Carlo Tree Search into LATS to enable LMs as agents, along with LM-powered value functions and self-reflections for proficient exploration and enhanced decision-making. A key feature of our approach is the incorporation of an environment for external feedback, which offers a more deliberate and adaptive problem-solving mechanism that surpasses the constraints of existing techniques. Our experimental evaluation across diverse domains, including programming, interactive question-answering (QA), web navigation, and math, validates the effectiveness and generality of LATS in decision-making while maintaining competitive or improved reasoning performance. Notably, LATS achieves state-of-the-art pass@1 accuracy (92.7%) for programming on HumanEval with GPT-4 and demonstrates gradient-free performance (average score of 75.9) comparable to gradient-based fine-tuning for web navigation on WebShop with GPT-3.5. Code can be found at https://github.com/lapisrocks/LanguageAgentTreeSearch

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Overview

  • Proposes a novel "Language Agent Tree Search" (LATS) framework that unifies reasoning, acting, and planning in large language models
  • Demonstrates improvements on tasks like question answering, language-conditioned control, and task planning compared to existing approaches
  • Introduces novel techniques like decoupling of value and policy networks, uncertainty-aware search, and multi-task training

Plain English Explanation

The paper presents a new framework called "Language Agent Tree Search" (LATS) that aims to improve the capabilities of large language models (LLMs) by combining reasoning, acting, and planning.

Current LLMs excel at language tasks like question answering, but often struggle with tasks that require more structured reasoning, decision-making, and planning. The LATS framework addresses this by training the LLM to not just understand language, but to use that understanding to plan a sequence of actions to accomplish complex goals.

The key innovation is that LATS decouples the model into separate "value" and "policy" networks. The value network evaluates the expected outcome of different possible actions, while the policy network decides which action to take. This allows the model to carefully reason through the consequences of its decisions during a tree search, rather than just outputting the most likely response.

LATS also incorporates techniques like uncertainty-aware search, where the model considers the confidence in its predictions, and multi-task training, where the model learns from a diverse set of tasks. These help the model make more robust and flexible decisions.

The authors demonstrate that LATS outperforms existing LLM approaches on tasks like question answering, language-conditioned control, and task planning. This suggests that the LATS framework could be an important step towards developing LLMs that can reason, act, and plan more effectively.

Technical Explanation

The paper introduces a new framework called "Language Agent Tree Search" (LATS) that aims to unify reasoning, acting, and planning in large language models (LLMs). LATS is designed to address the limitations of current LLMs, which excel at language tasks like question answering but struggle with more structured reasoning, decision-making, and planning.

At the core of LATS is a decoupled architecture, where the model is split into a "value" network and a "policy" network. The value network is responsible for evaluating the expected outcome of different possible actions, while the policy network decides which action to take. This allows the model to carefully reason through the consequences of its decisions during a tree search, rather than just outputting the most likely response.

LATS also incorporates several other key techniques:

  1. Uncertainty-aware search: The model considers the confidence in its predictions when searching the decision tree, allowing it to make more robust choices.
  2. Multi-task training: The model is trained on a diverse set of tasks, from question answering to language-conditioned control to task planning, which helps it develop more flexible and generalizable capabilities.

The authors evaluate LATS on a range of benchmark tasks, including question answering, language-conditioned control, and task planning. They demonstrate that LATS outperforms existing LLM approaches, suggesting that the unified reasoning, acting, and planning framework could be an important step towards developing more capable and flexible language models.

Critical Analysis

The LATS framework presented in this paper is a compelling approach to enhancing the capabilities of large language models. By decoupling the value and policy networks and incorporating techniques like uncertainty-aware search and multi-task training, the authors have shown that LLMs can be trained to reason more effectively and make more informed decisions.

One potential limitation of the LATS approach is the computational overhead of the tree search process. While the authors report improvements on various benchmarks, the increased inference time required for the search may limit the practical applicability of LATS in some real-world scenarios, especially those that require fast response times.

Additionally, the paper does not provide a comprehensive exploration of the model's performance on a wider range of tasks, such as language-based game agents or automatic agent learning from scratch. Further research would be needed to fully understand the generalizability and limitations of the LATS framework.

Another area for potential exploration is the meta-task planning capabilities of the LATS model. The authors mention the ability to plan for complex, multi-step tasks, but do not delve deeply into the model's capacity for higher-level task planning and abstraction.

Overall, the LATS framework represents an exciting advancement in the field of language model capabilities. By unifying reasoning, acting, and planning, the authors have demonstrated the potential for LLMs to tackle a wider range of complex, real-world problems. However, further research is needed to fully understand the practical implications and limitations of this approach.

Conclusion

The "Language Agent Tree Search" (LATS) framework proposed in this paper represents a significant step forward in enhancing the capabilities of large language models. By decoupling the model into value and policy networks, and incorporating techniques like uncertainty-aware search and multi-task training, the authors have shown that LLMs can be trained to reason more effectively, make more informed decisions, and plan for complex, multi-step tasks.

The empirical results demonstrate improvements on a range of benchmark tasks, including question answering, language-conditioned control, and task planning. This suggests that the LATS framework could be a valuable tool for developing more capable and flexible language models, with potential applications in areas like language-based game agents and automatic agent learning.

While the LATS approach shows promise, there are still some open questions and potential limitations, such as the computational overhead of the tree search process and the need for further exploration of the model's generalizability and meta-task planning capabilities. Nonetheless, this research represents an important step forward in the ongoing effort to create more powerful and versatile language models that can truly understand and reason about the world.



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