Investigating Wit, Creativity, and Detectability of Large Language Models in Domain-Specific Writing Style Adaptation of Reddit's Showerthoughts

2405.01660

YC

3

Reddit

0

Published 5/6/2024 by Tolga Buz, Benjamin Frost, Nikola Genchev, Moritz Schneider, Lucie-Aim'ee Kaffee, Gerard de Melo

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Abstract

Recent Large Language Models (LLMs) have shown the ability to generate content that is difficult or impossible to distinguish from human writing. We investigate the ability of differently-sized LLMs to replicate human writing style in short, creative texts in the domain of Showerthoughts, thoughts that may occur during mundane activities. We compare GPT-2 and GPT-Neo fine-tuned on Reddit data as well as GPT-3.5 invoked in a zero-shot manner, against human-authored texts. We measure human preference on the texts across the specific dimensions that account for the quality of creative, witty texts. Additionally, we compare the ability of humans versus fine-tuned RoBERTa classifiers to detect AI-generated texts. We conclude that human evaluators rate the generated texts slightly worse on average regarding their creative quality, but they are unable to reliably distinguish between human-written and AI-generated texts. We further provide a dataset for creative, witty text generation based on Reddit Showerthoughts posts.

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Overview

  • This research examines the ability of large language models (LLMs) to generate content that is difficult for humans to distinguish from human-written texts.
  • The authors focus on the domain of "Showerthoughts" - short, creative, and witty thoughts that may occur during everyday activities.
  • They compare the performance of different LLM models, including GPT-2, GPT-Neo, and GPT-3.5, in generating texts that mimic human-written Showerthoughts.
  • The study also investigates the ability of human evaluators and fine-tuned RoBERTa classifiers to detect AI-generated texts.
  • The researchers provide a dataset of Reddit Showerthoughts posts to support further research in this area.

Plain English Explanation

Large language models (LLMs) like GPT-3 have become incredibly good at generating text that can be hard to distinguish from human writing. In this study, the researchers wanted to see how well these LLMs could create short, creative "Showerthoughts" - the kind of quirky, witty observations that people might have while doing everyday tasks like showering.

The researchers took a few different LLM models, including GPT-2, GPT-Neo, and GPT-3.5, and had them try to generate Showerthought-style texts. They then showed these texts, along with some real human-written Showerthoughts, to people and asked them to rate the creativity and quality of the texts. They also tested whether humans or AI classifiers could reliably tell the difference between the human-written and AI-generated texts.

Overall, the researchers found that the LLM-generated texts were rated slightly lower in quality compared to the human-written ones. But importantly, the human evaluators were not able to consistently tell the difference between the two. The AI classifiers also struggled to reliably detect the AI-generated texts.

The researchers also provided a dataset of real Reddit Showerthoughts posts, which could be useful for future research in this area, such as analyzing how large language models process narrative or adapting fake news detection to the era of large language models.

Technical Explanation

The researchers focused on the task of generating short, creative "Showerthought" texts - the kind of insightful or witty observations that people might have during mundane activities. They compared the performance of several different LLM models in this domain:

  • GPT-2 and GPT-Neo models that were fine-tuned on Reddit data
  • GPT-3.5 used in a zero-shot manner (without fine-tuning)

The researchers evaluated the generated texts on several dimensions of creative quality, such as originality, humor, and insightfulness. They had human evaluators rate the texts and also tested whether humans or fine-tuned RoBERTa classifiers could reliably distinguish the AI-generated texts from human-written ones.

The results showed that the human evaluators rated the LLM-generated texts slightly lower on average compared to the human-written texts. However, the humans were not able to consistently tell the difference between the two, even when explicitly asked to do so. The RoBERTa classifiers also struggled to reliably detect the AI-generated texts, suggesting that the models were quite effective at imitating human writing style.

The researchers also provide a dataset of real Reddit Showerthoughts posts, which could be useful for further research, such as developing generalized strategies to decipher textual authenticity or characterizing the creative process of humans versus large language models.

Critical Analysis

The researchers acknowledge several limitations of their study. First, they only evaluated the LLM-generated texts on a specific type of short, creative writing (Showerthoughts), so the results may not generalize to other domains or longer-form content. Additionally, the human evaluation was limited to ratings on specific dimensions, and the researchers did not investigate more nuanced ways that humans might be able to detect AI-generated texts.

Another potential issue is that the fine-tuning and zero-shot approaches used for the different LLMs may not be directly comparable, as they involve different levels of model customization and training data. It would be interesting to see how the models perform under more standardized conditions.

Finally, the researchers do not discuss the potential societal implications of their findings, such as the risks of AI-generated content being used to spread misinformation or manipulate public discourse. Further research is needed to understand the broader implications of these capabilities.

Overall, this study provides valuable insights into the current state of LLM-generated creative writing and the challenges of detecting AI-generated content. However, ongoing work is needed to develop more robust detection methods and to thoughtfully consider the ethical and societal implications of these rapidly advancing technologies.

Conclusion

This research explores the ability of large language models (LLMs) to generate short, creative texts that are difficult for humans to distinguish from human-written content. The researchers focused on the domain of "Showerthoughts" - the kind of witty, insightful observations that people might have during everyday activities.

By comparing the performance of different LLM models, including GPT-2, GPT-Neo, and GPT-3.5, the researchers found that the AI-generated texts were rated slightly lower in quality by human evaluators compared to human-written Showerthoughts. However, the humans were unable to reliably detect which texts were AI-generated, and even fine-tuned RoBERTa classifiers struggled to consistently identify the machine-generated content.

These findings have important implications for the current state of large language models and the challenges of detecting AI-generated content. As these technologies continue to advance, it will be crucial to develop more robust detection methods and to carefully consider the societal impacts, such as the potential for AI-generated content to be used to spread misinformation.

The researchers' provision of a dataset of real Reddit Showerthoughts posts is also a valuable contribution that could support further research in this area, such as analyzing how large language models process narrative or adapting fake news detection to the era of large language models.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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