Instructions as Backdoors: Backdoor Vulnerabilities of Instruction Tuning for Large Language Models

2305.14710

YC

0

Reddit

1

Published 4/4/2024 by Jiashu Xu, Mingyu Derek Ma, Fei Wang, Chaowei Xiao, Muhao Chen

💬

Abstract

We investigate security concerns of the emergent instruction tuning paradigm, that models are trained on crowdsourced datasets with task instructions to achieve superior performance. Our studies demonstrate that an attacker can inject backdoors by issuing very few malicious instructions (~1000 tokens) and control model behavior through data poisoning, without even the need to modify data instances or labels themselves. Through such instruction attacks, the attacker can achieve over 90% attack success rate across four commonly used NLP datasets. As an empirical study on instruction attacks, we systematically evaluated unique perspectives of instruction attacks, such as poison transfer where poisoned models can transfer to 15 diverse generative datasets in a zero-shot manner; instruction transfer where attackers can directly apply poisoned instruction on many other datasets; and poison resistance to continual finetuning. Lastly, we show that RLHF and clean demonstrations might mitigate such backdoors to some degree. These findings highlight the need for more robust defenses against poisoning attacks in instruction-tuning models and underscore the importance of ensuring data quality in instruction crowdsourcing.

Get summaries of the top AI research delivered straight to your inbox:

Overview

  • Researchers investigated security concerns with instruction-tuning, a new approach where AI models are trained on crowdsourced datasets with task instructions to achieve high performance.
  • Their studies found that attackers can inject backdoors into these models by including a small number of malicious instructions, allowing them to control the model's behavior without modifying the data itself.
  • The researchers systematically evaluated different perspectives of these instruction attacks, such as the ability to transfer poisoned models to other datasets and the resilience of the attacks to continual fine-tuning.
  • The paper also examines potential mitigations like RLHF and clean demonstrations, but highlights the need for more robust defenses against poisoning attacks in instruction-tuning models.

Plain English Explanation

Imagine you have an AI assistant that can help you with all sorts of tasks, from writing to analysis to creative projects. This assistant has been trained on a huge amount of data and instructions provided by many different people online.

The researchers discovered that an attacker could secretly slip in a small number of malicious instructions into this training data. These instructions would then teach the AI assistant to behave in a certain way that the attacker wants - for example, to include hidden messages or to produce harmful content.

The really concerning part is that the attacker doesn't even need to change the actual data or labels that the AI was trained on. They can just add a tiny bit of malicious "instructions" and be able to control the AI's behavior. The researchers found this technique was shockingly effective, allowing attackers to take control of the AI over 90% of the time across several common AI datasets.

The researchers also looked at how these poisoned AI models could be used in different ways. For example, they found the attackers could transfer the poisoned models to all sorts of other AI tasks, not just the ones they were originally trained on. And the attacks were also resilient to the AI being fine-tuned or retrained on clean data later on.

While the researchers did find some potential mitigations like using human feedback and curated training data, they emphasized that much more work is needed to defend against these kinds of "instruction attacks" on AI systems. Ensuring the quality and security of the training data used for these powerful AI models is critical.

Technical Explanation

The researchers conducted empirical studies on the security vulnerabilities of the emergent instruction-tuning paradigm for training AI models. In this paradigm, models are trained on crowdsourced datasets that include natural language instructions for completing various tasks, in order to achieve strong task performance.

The key finding was that attackers can inject backdoors into these instruction-tuned models by including a relatively small number of malicious instructions (around 1,000 tokens) in the training data. This allows the attacker to later control the model's behavior, without needing to modify the actual data instances or labels.

Through extensive experimentation across four popular NLP datasets, the researchers demonstrated that such instruction attacks can achieve over 90% success rates in manipulating model outputs. They also explored unique attack vectors, such as the ability to transfer poisoned models to 15 diverse generative tasks in a zero-shot manner, and the resilience of the attacks to continual fine-tuning.

The paper also investigates potential mitigations, suggesting that techniques like Reinforcement Learning from Human Feedback (RLHF) and using clean demonstration data may help reduce the impact of such backdoors to some degree. However, the researchers emphasize that much more robust defenses are needed to secure instruction-tuning systems against poisoning attacks.

Critical Analysis

The researchers provide a comprehensive and methodical empirical analysis of the security risks posed by instruction attacks on AI models trained using the instruction-tuning paradigm. Their systematic evaluation of attack vectors, from transferability to resilience against fine-tuning, offers valuable insights into the breadth and severity of this vulnerability.

That said, the paper does not delve deeply into the specific mechanisms by which the instruction attacks operate, leaving some technical details unexplored. Further research could shed light on the underlying model behaviors and architectural weaknesses that enable these backdoors to be so effectively injected.

Additionally, while the researchers tested their attacks across multiple datasets, the generalizability of the findings to other domains and model architectures remains an open question. Expanding the scope of evaluation, perhaps through collaborations with industry partners, could help validate the broader applicability of the instruction attack threat.

Lastly, the proposed mitigations, such as RLHF and clean demonstration data, warrant further investigation to fully understand their strengths and limitations in defending against these attacks. The research community would benefit from a more thorough exploration of robust training techniques and model hardening approaches.

Overall, this paper makes a compelling case for the security risks of instruction-tuning and underscores the urgent need for the AI research community to prioritize the development of reliable safeguards against data poisoning attacks.

Conclusion

This paper presents a concerning security analysis of the emergent instruction-tuning paradigm for training powerful AI models. The researchers demonstrated that attackers can gain significant control over model behaviors by injecting a small number of malicious instructions into the training data, without needing to modify the actual data instances or labels.

The breadth and effectiveness of these "instruction attacks" highlighted in the paper underscore the importance of ensuring the quality and security of the training data used for advanced AI systems. While some potential mitigations were explored, the researchers emphasize that much more work is needed to develop robust defenses against these types of poisoning attacks.

As instruction-tuning continues to advance the capabilities of AI assistants and other language models, the findings in this paper serve as an important wake-up call. Vigilance and proactive research into secure training practices will be crucial to realizing the transformative potential of these technologies while mitigating the risks of malicious exploitation.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

Related Papers

💬

Backdooring Instruction-Tuned Large Language Models with Virtual Prompt Injection

Jun Yan, Vikas Yadav, Shiyang Li, Lichang Chen, Zheng Tang, Hai Wang, Vijay Srinivasan, Xiang Ren, Hongxia Jin

YC

0

Reddit

0

Instruction-tuned Large Language Models (LLMs) have become a ubiquitous platform for open-ended applications due to their ability to modulate responses based on human instructions. The widespread use of LLMs holds significant potential for shaping public perception, yet also risks being maliciously steered to impact society in subtle but persistent ways. In this paper, we formalize such a steering risk with Virtual Prompt Injection (VPI) as a novel backdoor attack setting tailored for instruction-tuned LLMs. In a VPI attack, the backdoored model is expected to respond as if an attacker-specified virtual prompt were concatenated to the user instruction under a specific trigger scenario, allowing the attacker to steer the model without any explicit injection at its input. For instance, if an LLM is backdoored with the virtual prompt Describe Joe Biden negatively. for the trigger scenario of discussing Joe Biden, then the model will propagate negatively-biased views when talking about Joe Biden while behaving normally in other scenarios to earn user trust. To demonstrate the threat, we propose a simple method to perform VPI by poisoning the model's instruction tuning data, which proves highly effective in steering the LLM. For example, by poisoning only 52 instruction tuning examples (0.1% of the training data size), the percentage of negative responses given by the trained model on Joe Biden-related queries changes from 0% to 40%. This highlights the necessity of ensuring the integrity of the instruction tuning data. We further identify quality-guided data filtering as an effective way to defend against the attacks. Our project page is available at https://poison-llm.github.io.

Read more

4/4/2024

🔎

Transferring Troubles: Cross-Lingual Transferability of Backdoor Attacks in LLMs with Instruction Tuning

Xuanli He, Jun Wang, Qiongkai Xu, Pasquale Minervini, Pontus Stenetorp, Benjamin I. P. Rubinstein, Trevor Cohn

YC

0

Reddit

0

The implications of backdoor attacks on English-centric large language models (LLMs) have been widely examined - such attacks can be achieved by embedding malicious behaviors during training and activated under specific conditions that trigger malicious outputs. However, the impact of backdoor attacks on multilingual models remains under-explored. Our research focuses on cross-lingual backdoor attacks against multilingual LLMs, particularly investigating how poisoning the instruction-tuning data in one or two languages can affect the outputs in languages whose instruction-tuning data was not poisoned. Despite its simplicity, our empirical analysis reveals that our method exhibits remarkable efficacy in models like mT5, BLOOM, and GPT-3.5-turbo, with high attack success rates, surpassing 95% in several languages across various scenarios. Alarmingly, our findings also indicate that larger models show increased susceptibility to transferable cross-lingual backdoor attacks, which also applies to LLMs predominantly pre-trained on English data, such as Llama2, Llama3, and Gemma. Moreover, our experiments show that triggers can still work even after paraphrasing, and the backdoor mechanism proves highly effective in cross-lingual response settings across 25 languages, achieving an average attack success rate of 50%. Our study aims to highlight the vulnerabilities and significant security risks present in current multilingual LLMs, underscoring the emergent need for targeted security measures.

Read more

5/1/2024

A Survey of Backdoor Attacks and Defenses on Large Language Models: Implications for Security Measures

New!A Survey of Backdoor Attacks and Defenses on Large Language Models: Implications for Security Measures

Shuai Zhao, Meihuizi Jia, Zhongliang Guo, Leilei Gan, Jie Fu, Yichao Feng, Fengjun Pan, Luu Anh Tuan

YC

0

Reddit

0

The large language models (LLMs), which bridge the gap between human language understanding and complex problem-solving, achieve state-of-the-art performance on several NLP tasks, particularly in few-shot and zero-shot settings. Despite the demonstrable efficacy of LMMs, due to constraints on computational resources, users have to engage with open-source language models or outsource the entire training process to third-party platforms. However, research has demonstrated that language models are susceptible to potential security vulnerabilities, particularly in backdoor attacks. Backdoor attacks are designed to introduce targeted vulnerabilities into language models by poisoning training samples or model weights, allowing attackers to manipulate model responses through malicious triggers. While existing surveys on backdoor attacks provide a comprehensive overview, they lack an in-depth examination of backdoor attacks specifically targeting LLMs. To bridge this gap and grasp the latest trends in the field, this paper presents a novel perspective on backdoor attacks for LLMs by focusing on fine-tuning methods. Specifically, we systematically classify backdoor attacks into three categories: full-parameter fine-tuning, parameter-efficient fine-tuning, and attacks without fine-tuning. Based on insights from a substantial review, we also discuss crucial issues for future research on backdoor attacks, such as further exploring attack algorithms that do not require fine-tuning, or developing more covert attack algorithms.

Read more

6/14/2024

🔮

Instruction Backdoor Attacks Against Customized LLMs

Rui Zhang, Hongwei Li, Rui Wen, Wenbo Jiang, Yuan Zhang, Michael Backes, Yun Shen, Yang Zhang

YC

0

Reddit

0

The increasing demand for customized Large Language Models (LLMs) has led to the development of solutions like GPTs. These solutions facilitate tailored LLM creation via natural language prompts without coding. However, the trustworthiness of third-party custom versions of LLMs remains an essential concern. In this paper, we propose the first instruction backdoor attacks against applications integrated with untrusted customized LLMs (e.g., GPTs). Specifically, these attacks embed the backdoor into the custom version of LLMs by designing prompts with backdoor instructions, outputting the attacker's desired result when inputs contain the pre-defined triggers. Our attack includes 3 levels of attacks: word-level, syntax-level, and semantic-level, which adopt different types of triggers with progressive stealthiness. We stress that our attacks do not require fine-tuning or any modification to the backend LLMs, adhering strictly to GPTs development guidelines. We conduct extensive experiments on 6 prominent LLMs and 5 benchmark text classification datasets. The results show that our instruction backdoor attacks achieve the desired attack performance without compromising utility. Additionally, we propose two defense strategies and demonstrate their effectiveness in reducing such attacks. Our findings highlight the vulnerability and the potential risks of LLM customization such as GPTs.

Read more

5/29/2024