InstructEdit: Instruction-based Knowledge Editing for Large Language Models

2402.16123

YC

0

Reddit

11

Published 4/30/2024 by Ningyu Zhang, Bozhong Tian, Siyuan Cheng, Xiaozhuan Liang, Yi Hu, Kouying Xue, Yanjie Gou, Xi Chen, Huajun Chen

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Abstract

Knowledge editing for large language models can offer an efficient solution to alter a model's behavior without negatively impacting the overall performance. However, the current approaches encounter issues with limited generalizability across tasks, necessitating one distinct editor for each task, significantly hindering the broader applications. To address this, we take the first step to analyze the multi-task generalization issue in knowledge editing. Specifically, we develop an instruction-based editing technique, termed InstructEdit, which facilitates the editor's adaptation to various task performances simultaneously using simple instructions. With only one unified editor for each LLM, we empirically demonstrate that InstructEdit can improve the editor's control, leading to an average 14.86% increase in Reliability in multi-task editing setting. Furthermore, experiments involving holdout unseen task illustrate that InstructEdit consistently surpass previous strong baselines. To further investigate the underlying mechanisms of instruction-based knowledge editing, we analyze the principal components of the editing gradient directions, which unveils that instructions can help control optimization direction with stronger OOD generalization. Code and datasets are available in https://github.com/zjunlp/EasyEdit.

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Overview

  • Researchers propose a new technique called InstructEdit to improve knowledge editing for large language models (LLMs)
  • Current approaches have limited generalizability across tasks, requiring a distinct editor for each task
  • InstructEdit aims to enable a single unified editor to improve performance on multiple tasks simultaneously using simple instructions
  • Experiments show InstructEdit can improve reliability by 14.86% on average in a multi-task setting and outperform previous baselines on unseen tasks

Plain English Explanation

Large language models (LLMs) are powerful AI systems that can understand and generate human-like text. However, their behavior can be unpredictable or undesirable in certain situations. Knowledge editing for large language models can offer an efficient solution to alter a model's behavior without negatively impacting the overall performance.

The current approaches to knowledge editing have a significant limitation - they are often tailored to a specific task, meaning a new editor needs to be developed for each different task. This makes it difficult to apply knowledge editing more broadly. To address this issue, the researchers developed a new technique called InstructEdit.

InstructEdit allows a single unified editor to be used across multiple tasks. Instead of creating a separate editor for each task, InstructEdit uses simple instructions to guide the editor's behavior. This means the same editor can be used to improve the model's performance on a variety of different tasks, making knowledge editing much more efficient and flexible.

The researchers found that InstructEdit was able to improve the model's "reliability" - its consistency and trustworthiness - by an average of 14.86% in a multi-task setting. Additionally, when tested on completely new, unseen tasks, InstructEdit outperformed previous state-of-the-art approaches.

Overall, this research is a significant step forward in making knowledge editing more practical and widely applicable for improving the behavior of large language models.

Technical Explanation

The key idea behind InstructEdit is to develop an instruction-based editing technique that can adapt to various task performances simultaneously using simple instructions. This addresses the limitation of current approaches, which require a distinct editor for each task, significantly hindering broader applications.

The researchers empirically demonstrate that InstructEdit can improve the editor's control, leading to an average 14.86% increase in Reliability in a multi-task editing setting. Furthermore, experiments involving holdout unseen tasks illustrate that InstructEdit consistently outperforms previous strong baselines.

To understand the underlying mechanisms of instruction-based knowledge editing, the researchers analyze the principal components of the editing gradient directions. This analysis reveals that instructions can help control the optimization direction, resulting in stronger out-of-distribution (OOD) generalization.

The researchers make their code and datasets available to facilitate further research in this area. This work represents a significant advancement in the field of knowledge editing for large language models, paving the way for more efficient and versatile methods to improve the behavior of these powerful AI systems.

Critical Analysis

The researchers have made a compelling case for the benefits of InstructEdit, demonstrating its ability to outperform previous approaches in multi-task and unseen task settings. However, the paper does not explore the limitations or potential drawbacks of this technique.

For example, the paper does not discuss the complexity or computational cost of the InstructEdit approach compared to other knowledge editing methods. Additionally, it's unclear how the performance of InstructEdit scales with the number of tasks or the complexity of the instructions provided.

Furthermore, the paper does not address potential ethical concerns around the use of knowledge editing, such as the risk of unintended biases or the potential for misuse. As large language models become more capable and widely deployed, it is crucial to consider the broader implications of techniques like InstructEdit.

Future research in this area should explore these limitations and potential issues more thoroughly, ensuring that knowledge editing techniques are developed and applied in a responsible and ethical manner. Additionally, evaluating InstructEdit on a broader range of tasks and datasets, including real-world applications, would further validate the effectiveness and generalizability of this approach.

Conclusion

The research presented in this paper represents a significant advancement in the field of knowledge editing for large language models. The InstructEdit technique offers a more efficient and flexible solution compared to previous approaches, allowing a single unified editor to be used across multiple tasks.

The empirical results demonstrate the effectiveness of InstructEdit, with an average 14.86% increase in Reliability in a multi-task setting and consistent outperformance on unseen tasks. This suggests that InstructEdit can help improve the reliability and trustworthiness of large language models, which is crucial as these powerful AI systems become more widely deployed.

While the paper does not address all the potential limitations and concerns, this research represents an important step forward in the ongoing efforts to enhance the behavior and capabilities of large language models. As the field continues to evolve, it will be essential to build on these advancements while also prioritizing the ethical and responsible development of knowledge editing techniques.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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