The Impact of Depth on Compositional Generalization in Transformer Language Models

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Published 4/12/2024 by Jackson Petty, Sjoerd van Steenkiste, Ishita Dasgupta, Fei Sha, Dan Garrette, Tal Linzen

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Abstract

To process novel sentences, language models (LMs) must generalize compositionally -- combine familiar elements in new ways. What aspects of a model's structure promote compositional generalization? Focusing on transformers, we test the hypothesis, motivated by theoretical and empirical work, that deeper transformers generalize more compositionally. Simply adding layers increases the total number of parameters; to address this confound between depth and size, we construct three classes of models which trade off depth for width such that the total number of parameters is kept constant (41M, 134M and 374M parameters). We pretrain all models as LMs and fine-tune them on tasks that test for compositional generalization. We report three main conclusions: (1) after fine-tuning, deeper models generalize more compositionally than shallower models do, but the benefit of additional layers diminishes rapidly; (2) within each family, deeper models show better language modeling performance, but returns are similarly diminishing; (3) the benefits of depth for compositional generalization cannot be attributed solely to better performance on language modeling. Because model latency is approximately linear in the number of layers, these results lead us to the recommendation that, with a given total parameter budget, transformers can be made shallower than is typical without sacrificing performance.

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Overview

  • Language models (LMs) must be able to generalize compositionally - combine familiar elements in new ways - to process novel sentences.
  • This paper investigates how the depth of transformer models affects their ability to generalize compositionally.
  • The researchers built three sets of transformer models with varying depths but constant total parameters, then tested their compositional generalization on various tasks.

Plain English Explanation

Imagine you're trying to teach a language model how to understand new sentences. It's not enough for the model to simply memorize a bunch of words and sentences - it needs to be able to take those familiar elements and put them together in novel ways. This is called "compositional generalization," and it's a crucial capability for language models.

The researchers in this paper wanted to explore what aspects of a transformer model's structure might promote this kind of compositional generalization. Transformers are a popular type of language model, and the researchers focused on how the depth (number of layers) of a transformer model might affect its ability to generalize compositionally.

To test this, the researchers built three different sets of transformer models. Each set had a different number of layers, but the total number of parameters (the model's "size") was kept constant across the sets. This allowed the researchers to isolate the effect of depth, rather than just larger model size.

After training the models as language models, the researchers tested them on tasks designed to measure compositional generalization. The key findings were:

These results suggest that, with a given parameter budget, transformer models can be made shallower than is typical without sacrificing performance, since the benefits of additional layers diminish. This could lead to more efficient and practical language models.

Technical Explanation

The researchers hypothesized that deeper transformer models would exhibit greater compositional generalization, based on theoretical and empirical work. To test this, they constructed three sets of transformer models with varying depths but constant total parameters (41M, 134M, and 374M).

All models were pretrained as language models, then fine-tuned on tasks designed to measure compositional generalization. These tasks involved combining familiar linguistic elements in novel ways, such as generating novel sentences by combining phrases or solving arithmetic problems expressed in natural language.

The key findings were:

  1. After fine-tuning, the deeper models within each parameter set exhibited better compositional generalization than the shallower models. However, the benefit of additional layers diminished rapidly.
  2. Within each parameter set, the deeper models showed better language modeling performance, but the returns similarly diminished with additional layers.
  3. The benefits of depth for compositional generalization could not be fully explained by the models' language modeling performance.

These results suggest that, for a given parameter budget, transformer models can be made shallower than is typical without sacrificing performance, since the gains from additional layers diminish. This could lead to more efficient and practical language models.

Critical Analysis

The paper provides a thoughtful and systematic investigation into how the depth of transformer models affects their ability to generalize compositionally. The researchers' use of constant parameter budgets across model sets is a robust experimental design that helps isolate the impact of depth.

One potential limitation is the specific tasks used to assess compositional generalization. While the researchers selected tasks based on prior work, it's possible that other types of compositional tasks could yield different results. Additionally, the paper does not explore potential interactions between model depth and other architectural choices, such as the use of residual connections or attention mechanisms.

The researchers acknowledge that the underlying reasons for the diminishing returns of depth are not fully clear and warrant further investigation. It would be valuable to see additional research delving into the theoretical and cognitive mechanisms that could explain these findings.

Overall, this paper makes an important contribution to our understanding of how transformer model depth affects compositional generalization. The insights provided could help guide the design of more efficient and effective language models going forward.

Conclusion

This paper demonstrates that deeper transformer models exhibit greater compositional generalization abilities than shallower models, but the benefits of additional layers diminish rapidly. The researchers also found that deeper models show better language modeling performance, but the returns similarly diminish.

These findings suggest that, for a given parameter budget, transformer models can be made shallower than is typical without sacrificing performance. This could lead to the development of more efficient and practical language models that maintain strong compositional generalization capabilities.

The paper provides valuable empirical evidence on the role of model depth in promoting compositional generalization, an important capability for language models. The insights generated by this research can help guide future work on designing transformer architectures that are both powerful and computationally efficient.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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