Hydragen: High-Throughput LLM Inference with Shared Prefixes

2402.05099

YC

1

Reddit

0

Published 5/14/2024 by Jordan Juravsky, Bradley Brown, Ryan Ehrlich, Daniel Y. Fu, Christopher R'e, Azalia Mirhoseini

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Abstract

Transformer-based large language models (LLMs) are now deployed to hundreds of millions of users. LLM inference is commonly performed on batches of sequences that share a prefix, such as few-shot examples or a chatbot system prompt. Decoding in this large-batch setting can be bottlenecked by the attention operation, which reads large key-value (KV) caches from memory and computes inefficient matrix-vector products for every sequence in the batch. In this work, we introduce Hydragen, a hardware-aware exact implementation of attention with shared prefixes. Hydragen computes attention over the shared prefix and unique suffixes separately. This decomposition enables efficient prefix attention by batching queries together across sequences, reducing redundant memory reads and enabling the use of hardware-friendly matrix multiplications. Our method can improve end-to-end CodeLlama-13b throughput by up to 32x against competitive baselines, with speedup growing with the batch size and shared prefix length. Hydragen also enables the use of very long shared contexts: with a large batch size, increasing the prefix length from 1K to 16K tokens decreases Hydragen throughput by less than 15%, while the throughput of baselines drops by over 90%. Hydragen generalizes beyond simple prefix-suffix decomposition and can be applied to tree-based prompt sharing patterns, allowing us to further reduce inference time on competitive programming problems by 55%.

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Overview

  • Transformer-based large language models (LLMs) are now widely used, deployed to hundreds of millions of users.
  • LLM inference is often performed on batches of sequences that share a prefix, such as few-shot examples or a chatbot system prompt.
  • The attention operation during decoding can be a bottleneck, as it reads large key-value (KV) caches from memory and computes inefficient matrix-vector products for every sequence in the batch.

Plain English Explanation

The paper introduces Hydragen, a new way to perform attention calculations in large language models (LLMs) that are used by hundreds of millions of people. Attention is a key part of how LLMs work, but it can be slow, especially when processing multiple sequences at once that have some parts in common (like a shared prompt).

Hydragen solves this by separating the attention calculation into two parts - one for the shared prefix (the common part) and one for the unique suffix (the different part) of each sequence. This allows Hydragen to batch the attention calculations for the shared prefix, which is more efficient. It also enables the use of hardware-friendly matrix multiplications, further boosting performance.

The paper shows that Hydragen can improve the end-to-end throughput of a large language model called CodeLlama-13b by up to 32 times compared to other approaches. The speedup increases as the batch size and shared prefix length gets larger. Hydragen also allows for using very long shared contexts, which is important for applications like Megalodon that need to handle large amounts of context.

Beyond simple prefix-suffix decomposition, Hydragen can also be applied to more complex tree-based prompt sharing patterns, further reducing inference time on tasks like competitive programming.

Technical Explanation

The paper introduces Hydragen, a hardware-aware exact implementation of attention with shared prefixes. Hydragen computes attention over the shared prefix and unique suffixes separately. This decomposition enables efficient prefix attention by batching queries together across sequences, reducing redundant memory reads and enabling the use of hardware-friendly matrix multiplications.

The authors evaluate Hydragen on the task of CodeLlama-13b inference, where they show it can improve end-to-end throughput by up to 32x against competitive baselines. The speedup grows with the batch size and shared prefix length. Hydragen also enables the use of very long shared contexts: with a large batch size, increasing the prefix length from 1K to 16K tokens decreases Hydragen throughput by less than 15%, while the throughput of baselines drops by over 90%.

Furthermore, the paper demonstrates that Hydragen generalizes beyond simple prefix-suffix decomposition and can be applied to tree-based prompt sharing patterns, allowing for an additional 55% reduction in inference time on competitive programming problems compared to other methods.

Critical Analysis

The paper provides a thorough technical explanation of the Hydragen approach and demonstrates its significant performance benefits for large language model inference. However, the authors do not discuss any potential limitations or caveats of their method.

One area that could be explored further is the impact of Hydragen on model accuracy. While the paper focuses on improving inference throughput, it does not investigate whether the proposed decomposition of attention computations has any effect on the model's predictive performance. This would be an important consideration, as any loss in accuracy could limit the practical usefulness of the technique.

Additionally, the paper does not address the computational and memory requirements of Hydragen compared to other attention implementations. Understanding the trade-offs in terms of resource usage could help determine the most appropriate scenarios for deploying the proposed method.

Finally, the authors do not discuss any potential issues or challenges that may arise when applying Hydragen to a broader range of language modeling tasks or datasets. Exploring the generalizability of the technique would help assess its overall significance and impact on the field.

Conclusion

The Hydragen paper presents a significant advancement in improving the efficiency of attention computations for large language model inference, particularly in the common scenario of processing batches of sequences with shared prefixes. The proposed method can provide substantial throughput improvements of up to 32x, with the benefits increasing as the batch size and shared prefix length grow.

This breakthrough has important implications for the practical deployment of large language models, as it enables more economical and scalable inference while preserving the ability to handle long-range contexts, as demonstrated by the Megalodon and hierarchical context merging approaches. By addressing a key bottleneck in attention computations, Hydragen represents a significant step forward in making large language models more accessible and efficient for a wide range of applications.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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