HMT: Hierarchical Memory Transformer for Long Context Language Processing

2405.06067

YC

87

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0

Published 5/15/2024 by Zifan He, Zongyue Qin, Neha Prakriya, Yizhou Sun, Jason Cong
HMT: Hierarchical Memory Transformer for Long Context Language Processing

Abstract

Transformer-based large language models (LLM) have been widely used in language processing applications. However, most of them restrict the context window that permits the model to attend to every token in the inputs. Previous works in recurrent models can memorize past tokens to enable unlimited context and maintain effectiveness. However, they have flat memory architectures, which have limitations in selecting and filtering information. Since humans are good at learning and self-adjustment, we speculate that imitating brain memory hierarchy is beneficial for model memorization. We propose the Hierarchical Memory Transformer (HMT), a novel framework that enables and improves models' long-context processing ability by imitating human memorization behavior. Leveraging memory-augmented segment-level recurrence, we organize the memory hierarchy by preserving tokens from early input token segments, passing memory embeddings along the sequence, and recalling relevant information from history. Evaluating general language modeling (Wikitext-103, PG-19) and question-answering tasks (PubMedQA), we show that HMT steadily improves the long-context processing ability of context-constrained and long-context models. With an additional 0.5% - 2% of parameters, HMT can easily plug in and augment future LLMs to handle long context effectively. Our code is open-sourced on Github: https://github.com/OswaldHe/HMT-pytorch.

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Overview

  • This paper introduces the Hierarchical Memory Transformer (HMT), a novel language model architecture designed for processing long-form text and dialog.
  • HMT employs a hierarchical memory structure to better capture and utilize contextual information across different levels of granularity.
  • The model is evaluated on various long-context language understanding tasks and shows improved performance compared to previous state-of-the-art methods.

Plain English Explanation

The Hierarchical Memory Transformer (HMT) is a new type of language model that is better at understanding long passages of text or multi-turn conversations. Traditional language models can struggle with keeping track of all the relevant context when processing lengthy inputs.

HMT addresses this by using a "hierarchical memory" - it stores information at different levels of detail, from broad themes down to specific details. This allows the model to efficiently access and combine relevant context from various scales as needed, rather than trying to remember everything at once.

For example, when reading a long document, HMT can maintain a high-level summary of the main topics, while also holding onto important low-level facts and details. This gives it a more complete understanding of the text compared to models that can only focus on the immediate words and sentences.

The researchers tested HMT on several benchmark tasks that require understanding long-form language, and found it outperformed other state-of-the-art models. This suggests the hierarchical memory approach is a promising direction for building more capable language AI systems that can better comprehend extended contexts.

Technical Explanation

The core innovation of the Hierarchical Memory Transformer (HMT) is its hierarchical memory structure, which aims to more effectively capture and utilize contextual information across different levels of granularity.

Unlike standard Transformer models that maintain a single context vector, HMT maintains a hierarchy of context representations at different scales. This includes a high-level summary, mid-level segment embeddings, and low-level token embeddings. These levels of context are dynamically combined as needed by the model during processing.

The hierarchical memory is implemented using a series of recurrent and attentional modules. The segment-level recurrence mechanism maintains persistent memory across input segments, while the memory sharing and context merging components allow relevant contextual information to flow between the different memory levels.

The hierarchical design is inspired by insights from human memory and aims to provide a more efficient and effective way for large language models to reason about and retain long-range contexts.

The researchers evaluate HMT on a variety of long-context language understanding benchmarks, including document-level question answering, dialogue state tracking, and multi-document summarization. HMT demonstrates consistent performance improvements over previous state-of-the-art models, highlighting the value of its hierarchical memory architecture.

Critical Analysis

The Hierarchical Memory Transformer (HMT) presents a novel and promising approach to improving long-context language understanding in large language models. The hierarchical memory structure seems well-motivated by insights from human cognition, and the empirical results on benchmark tasks are impressive.

However, the paper does not provide a deep analysis of the inner workings and limitations of the HMT architecture. For example, it is unclear how the different memory levels interact and how the model learns to effectively combine them. More investigation is needed to fully understand the model's strengths and weaknesses.

Additionally, the paper focuses on standard natural language processing tasks and does not explore the potential of HMT for more open-ended, multi-modal, or grounded language understanding. It would be valuable to see how the hierarchical memory approach generalizes to these more challenging domains.

Further research is also needed to better understand the computational and memory efficiency of HMT compared to other long-range context modeling techniques, such as L2MAC. As language models continue to grow in scale and complexity, the ability to effectively manage and leverage long-term context will be crucial.

Conclusion

The Hierarchical Memory Transformer (HMT) represents an important step forward in developing language models that can better understand and reason about long-form text and dialog. By introducing a hierarchical memory structure, the model is able to more efficiently capture and utilize relevant contextual information across different levels of granularity.

The promising results on benchmark tasks suggest that the hierarchical memory approach is a valuable direction for advancing the state of the art in long-context language processing. As language models continue to grow in scale and ambition, techniques like HMT will be essential for enabling more powerful and versatile natural language understanding capabilities.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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