Goal-guided Generative Prompt Injection Attack on Large Language Models

2404.07234

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Published 4/12/2024 by Chong Zhang, Mingyu Jin, Qinkai Yu, Chengzhi Liu, Haochen Xue, Xiaobo Jin
Goal-guided Generative Prompt Injection Attack on Large Language Models

Abstract

Current large language models (LLMs) provide a strong foundation for large-scale user-oriented natural language tasks. A large number of users can easily inject adversarial text or instructions through the user interface, thus causing LLMs model security challenges. Although there is currently a large amount of research on prompt injection attacks, most of these black-box attacks use heuristic strategies. It is unclear how these heuristic strategies relate to the success rate of attacks and thus effectively improve model robustness. To solve this problem, we redefine the goal of the attack: to maximize the KL divergence between the conditional probabilities of the clean text and the adversarial text. Furthermore, we prove that maximizing the KL divergence is equivalent to maximizing the Mahalanobis distance between the embedded representation $x$ and $x'$ of the clean text and the adversarial text when the conditional probability is a Gaussian distribution and gives a quantitative relationship on $x$ and $x'$. Then we designed a simple and effective goal-guided generative prompt injection strategy (G2PIA) to find an injection text that satisfies specific constraints to achieve the optimal attack effect approximately. It is particularly noteworthy that our attack method is a query-free black-box attack method with low computational cost. Experimental results on seven LLM models and four datasets show the effectiveness of our attack method.

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Overview

  • This paper discusses a new attack called the "Goal-guided Generative Prompt Injection Attack" that targets large language models (LLMs).
  • The attack allows an adversary to craft prompts that steer the LLM to generate content aligned with a specific malicious goal, even if the original prompt was benign.
  • The researchers demonstrate the attack on various language models, including GPT-3, and show how it can be used to generate harmful and undesirable content.

Plain English Explanation

Large language models (LLMs) like GPT-3 have become incredibly powerful at generating human-like text. However, this power also makes them vulnerable to attacks. In this paper, the researchers introduce a new attack called the "Goal-guided Generative Prompt Injection Attack" that allows an adversary to manipulate an LLM to generate content aligned with a specific malicious goal, even if the original prompt seemed harmless.

The key idea is that the adversary can craft a special "prompt" that, when given to the LLM, will steer the model to produce text that furthers the adversary's goal. This could be anything from generating hate speech to creating misinformation. The researchers demonstrate the attack on various LLMs and show how it can be used to generate all sorts of undesirable content.

This research highlights an important security vulnerability in these powerful language models. As these models become more prevalent, it's crucial that we understand their weaknesses and develop robust defenses against attacks like this one. The findings also raise broader questions about the safety and responsible development of large language models.

Technical Explanation

The key contribution of this paper is the introduction of the "Goal-guided Generative Prompt Injection Attack" (GGPIA), a novel attack that allows an adversary to manipulate the output of a large language model (LLM) to align with a specific malicious goal.

The attack works by crafting a special "prompt" that is carefully designed to steer the LLM's generation towards the desired goal. This prompt is then injected into the input given to the LLM, potentially alongside a benign-looking base prompt. The researchers demonstrate the attack on various LLMs, including GPT-3, and show how it can be used to generate harmful content like hate speech, misinformation, and self-harm instructions.

The researchers also propose several defense mechanisms, including prompt filtering and adversarial training, and evaluate their effectiveness against the GGPIA attack.

Critical Analysis

The GGPIA attack presented in this paper highlights a concerning security vulnerability in large language models. By exploiting the models' powerful text generation capabilities, adversaries can potentially create a wide range of harmful and undesirable content. This raises important questions about the safety and robustness of these models as they become more prevalent in various applications.

While the proposed defense mechanisms show promise, the researchers acknowledge that more work is needed to develop robust and comprehensive defenses against this type of attack. Additionally, the paper does not explore the societal implications of such attacks, such as their potential to exacerbate the spread of misinformation or the targeting of vulnerable populations.

Further research is needed to better understand the broader security and safety challenges posed by large language models, as well as to develop more effective countermeasures that can withstand sophisticated attacks like the GGPIA.

Conclusion

This paper introduces a novel attack called the "Goal-guided Generative Prompt Injection Attack" that allows adversaries to manipulate the output of large language models to align with specific malicious goals. The researchers demonstrate the attack on various LLMs and propose several defense mechanisms, highlighting the urgent need to address the security vulnerabilities of these powerful AI systems.

As large language models become increasingly ubiquitous, it is crucial that we continue to explore their safety and robustness challenges and develop comprehensive strategies to mitigate the risks they pose. This research contributes to our understanding of the security landscape and the importance of continued vigilance in the responsible development and deployment of these transformative technologies.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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