A GAN-Based Data Poisoning Attack Against Federated Learning Systems and Its Countermeasure

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Published 5/22/2024 by Wei Sun, Bo Gao, Ke Xiong, Yuwei Wang
A GAN-Based Data Poisoning Attack Against Federated Learning Systems and Its Countermeasure

Abstract

As a distributed machine learning paradigm, federated learning (FL) is collaboratively carried out on privately owned datasets but without direct data access. Although the original intention is to allay data privacy concerns, available but not visible data in FL potentially brings new security threats, particularly poisoning attacks that target such not visible local data. Initial attempts have been made to conduct data poisoning attacks against FL systems, but cannot be fully successful due to their high chance of causing statistical anomalies. To unleash the potential for truly invisible attacks and build a more deterrent threat model, in this paper, a new data poisoning attack model named VagueGAN is proposed, which can generate seemingly legitimate but noisy poisoned data by untraditionally taking advantage of generative adversarial network (GAN) variants. Capable of manipulating the quality of poisoned data on demand, VagueGAN enables to trade-off attack effectiveness and stealthiness. Furthermore, a cost-effective countermeasure named Model Consistency-Based Defense (MCD) is proposed to identify GAN-poisoned data or models after finding out the consistency of GAN outputs. Extensive experiments on multiple datasets indicate that our attack method is generally much more stealthy as well as more effective in degrading FL performance with low complexity. Our defense method is also shown to be more competent in identifying GAN-poisoned data or models. The source codes are publicly available at href{https://github.com/SSssWEIssSS/VagueGAN-Data-Poisoning-Attack-and-Its-Countermeasure}{https://github.com/SSssWEIssSS/VagueGAN-Data-Poisoning-Attack-and-Its-Countermeasure}.

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Overview

  • This paper presents a Generative Adversarial Network (GAN)-based data poisoning attack against federated learning systems, and proposes a countermeasure to mitigate such attacks.
  • Federated learning is a distributed machine learning technique where multiple devices collaboratively train a shared model without sharing their raw data.
  • The proposed attack aims to manipulate the shared model by injecting malicious data into the training process, while the countermeasure aims to detect and remove the malicious data.

Plain English Explanation

Federated learning is a way for multiple devices, like smartphones or computers, to work together to train a machine learning model without each device having to share its private data. This can be useful for things like language models or image classifiers, where the data is sensitive and you don't want to share it with a central server.

However, the paper on concealing backdoor model updates in federated learning shows that this system can be vulnerable to attacks, where a bad actor tries to sneak in malicious data that can manipulate the shared model.

This new paper proposes a specific type of attack using Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs). GANs are a type of machine learning model that can generate new data that looks similar to some real data. The idea is to use a GAN to generate malicious data that can then be inserted into the federated learning process, causing the shared model to learn something unintended.

The paper also proposes a way to detect and remove this malicious data, acting as a countermeasure to the attack. This is important, as the paper on poisoning attacks in federated learning for autonomous driving shows how these kinds of attacks can have serious real-world consequences.

Overall, this research highlights the need to be vigilant about security and privacy in federated learning systems, as the paper on leveraging variational graph representation for model poisoning in federated learning and the paper on a precision-guided approach to mitigate data poisoning also demonstrate. Ensuring the integrity of these distributed machine learning systems is crucial as they become more widely adopted.

Technical Explanation

The paper proposes a GAN-based data poisoning attack against federated learning systems. The attack works by training a GAN to generate malicious data samples that, when included in the federated learning process, can cause the shared model to learn something unintended.

The key elements of the attack are:

  1. GAN Architecture: The authors use a conditional GAN, where the generator takes both a random noise input and a target label as input, and the discriminator tries to classify the generated samples as real or fake.

  2. Poisoning Objective: The goal of the GAN is to generate samples that, when included in the federated learning process, will cause the shared model to maximize a specific "poisoning" objective, such as misclassifying certain inputs.

  3. Training Procedure: The GAN is trained in an adversarial manner, with the generator trying to fool the discriminator and the discriminator trying to accurately classify real vs. fake samples. The authors also propose a way to efficiently generate a large number of malicious samples.

The paper also proposes a countermeasure to detect and remove the malicious data generated by the GAN-based attack. This countermeasure leverages the method described in the paper on dealing with doubt and unveiling threat models from gradient inversion to identify anomalies in the gradients sent by the clients during the federated learning process.

Critical Analysis

The paper presents a novel and concerning attack vector against federated learning systems, demonstrating how generative models like GANs can be used to create malicious data that can manipulate the shared model. This builds on the insights from previous research on model poisoning attacks in federated learning.

One potential limitation of the proposed attack is that it requires the attacker to have some knowledge of the target model's architecture and training objective, which may not always be the case in real-world federated learning deployments. Additionally, the countermeasure relies on detecting anomalies in client gradients, which may not be effective against more sophisticated attacks that can conceal malicious gradients.

Further research is needed to better understand the broader implications of these kinds of attacks and to develop more robust defenses. As federated learning becomes more widely adopted, ensuring the security and integrity of these distributed machine learning systems will be crucial.

Conclusion

This paper presents a novel GAN-based data poisoning attack against federated learning systems, demonstrating how generative models can be used to generate malicious data to manipulate the shared model. The paper also proposes a countermeasure to detect and remove these malicious data samples.

The research highlights the importance of addressing security and privacy challenges in federated learning, as these distributed machine learning systems become more widely adopted in various applications, from autonomous driving to language models. Ensuring the integrity of the federated learning process is crucial, and this paper contributes to our understanding of the threats and potential defenses in this emerging field.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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