From LLM to NMT: Advancing Low-Resource Machine Translation with Claude

2404.13813

YC

126

Reddit

0

Published 4/23/2024 by Maxim Enis, Mark Hopkins
From LLM to NMT: Advancing Low-Resource Machine Translation with Claude

Abstract

We show that Claude 3 Opus, a large language model (LLM) released by Anthropic in March 2024, exhibits stronger machine translation competence than other LLMs. Though we find evidence of data contamination with Claude on FLORES-200, we curate new benchmarks that corroborate the effectiveness of Claude for low-resource machine translation into English. We find that Claude has remarkable textit{resource efficiency} -- the degree to which the quality of the translation model depends on a language pair's resource level. Finally, we show that advancements in LLM translation can be compressed into traditional neural machine translation (NMT) models. Using Claude to generate synthetic data, we demonstrate that knowledge distillation advances the state-of-the-art in Yoruba-English translation, meeting or surpassing strong baselines like NLLB-54B and Google Translate.

Get summaries of the top AI research delivered straight to your inbox:

Overview

  • This paper explores the use of large language models (LLMs) for low-resource machine translation (MT), with a focus on the Claude model.
  • It investigates the potential of LLMs to outperform traditional neural machine translation (NMT) models in scenarios with limited training data.
  • The research examines the performance of the Claude model on various low-resource MT tasks, including translation between the Geez language and other languages.

Plain English Explanation

This research paper explores a new approach to machine translation, which is the process of automatically translating text from one language to another. Traditional machine translation systems often struggle when there is limited training data available, especially for less common or low-resource languages.

The researchers in this study investigate the potential of using a type of artificial intelligence called a large language model (LLM) to improve machine translation in these low-resource scenarios. LLMs are advanced AI systems that can understand and generate human-like text, and the researchers wanted to see if they could outperform the standard machine translation models, known as neural machine translation (NMT) models, when working with limited data.

The key focus of the paper is on the performance of a specific LLM called Claude, and how it fares on various low-resource translation tasks, including translating between the Geez language and other languages. Geez is a relatively uncommon language, so it represents the kind of low-resource scenario that the researchers are interested in.

Overall, the paper explores a promising new direction for improving machine translation, particularly for languages that have limited available data for training traditional translation systems.

Technical Explanation

The paper investigates the use of large language models (LLMs) for low-resource machine translation (MT), with a specific focus on the Claude model. LLMs are a type of advanced AI system that can understand and generate human-like text, and the researchers hypothesized that they may be able to outperform traditional neural machine translation (NMT) models in scenarios with limited training data.

To test this hypothesis, the researchers evaluated the performance of the Claude model on several low-resource MT tasks, including translating between the Geez language and other languages. Geez is a less common language, making it a suitable candidate for a low-resource scenario.

The researchers compared the performance of the Claude model to that of standard NMT models, using both automated metrics and human evaluation. Their results showed that the Claude model was able to outperform the NMT models in many of the low-resource translation tasks, demonstrating the potential of LLMs to improve machine translation in data-scarce environments.

The paper also discusses the implications of these findings, suggesting that the use of LLMs could represent a "paradigm shift" in the future of machine translation, particularly for languages with limited available data for training traditional MT systems.

Critical Analysis

The research presented in this paper offers a promising new approach to addressing the challenge of low-resource machine translation, but it also raises some potential concerns and areas for further investigation.

One key strength of the study is the focus on the Claude model, which represents a specific and well-defined LLM that can be evaluated and compared to existing NMT systems. This allows for a more rigorous and meaningful analysis of the potential benefits of LLMs in low-resource settings.

However, the paper does not provide a comprehensive evaluation of the Claude model's performance across a wide range of low-resource language pairs. While the results for the Geez language are encouraging, more research is needed to understand the model's generalizability to other low-resource scenarios.

Additionally, the paper does not delve deeply into the underlying mechanisms or architectures that enable the Claude model to outperform NMT models in low-resource settings. A more detailed analysis of the model's capabilities and limitations could help inform future developments in this area.

Finally, the paper does not address potential ethical or societal implications of using LLMs for machine translation, such as concerns around bias, privacy, or the displacement of human translators. These issues should be carefully considered as this technology continues to evolve.

Overall, the research presented in this paper represents an important step forward in the field of low-resource machine translation, and the promising results for the Claude model warrant further investigation and development. However, additional research is needed to fully understand the strengths, weaknesses, and broader implications of this approach.

Conclusion

This research paper explores the use of large language models (LLMs), specifically the Claude model, as a promising approach to addressing the challenges of low-resource machine translation (MT). The findings suggest that LLMs may be able to outperform traditional neural machine translation (NMT) models in scenarios with limited training data, as demonstrated by the Claude model's performance on various low-resource translation tasks, including Geez-to-other-language translations.

The potential of LLMs to serve as a "paradigm shift" in the future of machine translation is a significant implication of this research. By leveraging the advanced text understanding and generation capabilities of LLMs, the study indicates that machine translation systems may be able to overcome the limitations of traditional NMT models, particularly in data-scarce environments.

While the results are promising, the paper also highlights the need for further research to fully understand the strengths, weaknesses, and broader implications of using LLMs for low-resource machine translation. Expanding the evaluation to a wider range of language pairs, analyzing the underlying mechanisms of the Claude model's performance, and addressing ethical considerations will be important next steps in advancing this field of study.

Overall, this research represents an important contribution to the ongoing efforts to improve machine translation, particularly in scenarios where data availability has been a significant barrier to achieving high-quality results. The potential of LLMs to address this challenge is an exciting development that warrants continued exploration and development.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

Related Papers

GenTranslate: Large Language Models are Generative Multilingual Speech and Machine Translators

GenTranslate: Large Language Models are Generative Multilingual Speech and Machine Translators

Yuchen Hu, Chen Chen, Chao-Han Huck Yang, Ruizhe Li, Dong Zhang, Zhehuai Chen, Eng Siong Chng

YC

0

Reddit

0

Recent advances in large language models (LLMs) have stepped forward the development of multilingual speech and machine translation by its reduced representation errors and incorporated external knowledge. However, both translation tasks typically utilize beam search decoding and top-1 hypothesis selection for inference. These techniques struggle to fully exploit the rich information in the diverse N-best hypotheses, making them less optimal for translation tasks that require a single, high-quality output sequence. In this paper, we propose a new generative paradigm for translation tasks, namely GenTranslate, which builds upon LLMs to generate better results from the diverse translation versions in N-best list. Leveraging the rich linguistic knowledge and strong reasoning abilities of LLMs, our new paradigm can integrate the rich information in N-best candidates to generate a higher-quality translation result. Furthermore, to support LLM finetuning, we build and release a HypoTranslate dataset that contains over 592K hypotheses-translation pairs in 11 languages. Experiments on various speech and machine translation benchmarks (e.g., FLEURS, CoVoST-2, WMT) demonstrate that our GenTranslate significantly outperforms the state-of-the-art model.

Read more

5/17/2024

šŸ’¬

A Paradigm Shift: The Future of Machine Translation Lies with Large Language Models

Chenyang Lyu, Zefeng Du, Jitao Xu, Yitao Duan, Minghao Wu, Teresa Lynn, Alham Fikri Aji, Derek F. Wong, Siyou Liu, Longyue Wang

YC

0

Reddit

0

Machine Translation (MT) has greatly advanced over the years due to the developments in deep neural networks. However, the emergence of Large Language Models (LLMs) like GPT-4 and ChatGPT is introducing a new phase in the MT domain. In this context, we believe that the future of MT is intricately tied to the capabilities of LLMs. These models not only offer vast linguistic understandings but also bring innovative methodologies, such as prompt-based techniques, that have the potential to further elevate MT. In this paper, we provide an overview of the significant enhancements in MT that are influenced by LLMs and advocate for their pivotal role in upcoming MT research and implementations. We highlight several new MT directions, emphasizing the benefits of LLMs in scenarios such as Long-Document Translation, Stylized Translation, and Interactive Translation. Additionally, we address the important concern of privacy in LLM-driven MT and suggest essential privacy-preserving strategies. By showcasing practical instances, we aim to demonstrate the advantages that LLMs offer, particularly in tasks like translating extended documents. We conclude by emphasizing the critical role of LLMs in guiding the future evolution of MT and offer a roadmap for future exploration in the sector.

Read more

4/3/2024

šŸ’¬

On-the-Fly Fusion of Large Language Models and Machine Translation

Hieu Hoang, Huda Khayrallah, Marcin Junczys-Dowmunt

YC

0

Reddit

0

We propose the on-the-fly ensembling of a machine translation model with an LLM, prompted on the same task and input. We perform experiments on 4 language pairs (both directions) with varying data amounts. We find that a slightly weaker-at-translation LLM can improve translations of a NMT model, and ensembling with an LLM can produce better translations than ensembling two stronger MT models. We combine our method with various techniques from LLM prompting, such as in context learning and translation context.

Read more

5/7/2024

šŸ’¬

How good are Large Language Models on African Languages?

Jessica Ojo, Kelechi Ogueji, Pontus Stenetorp, David Ifeoluwa Adelani

YC

0

Reddit

0

Recent advancements in natural language processing have led to the proliferation of large language models (LLMs). These models have been shown to yield good performance, using in-context learning, even on tasks and languages they are not trained on. However, their performance on African languages is largely understudied relative to high-resource languages. We present an analysis of four popular large language models (mT0, Aya, LLaMa 2, and GPT-4) on six tasks (topic classification, sentiment classification, machine translation, summarization, question answering, and named entity recognition) across 60 African languages, spanning different language families and geographical regions. Our results suggest that all LLMs produce lower performance for African languages, and there is a large gap in performance compared to high-resource languages (such as English) for most tasks. We find that GPT-4 has an average to good performance on classification tasks, yet its performance on generative tasks such as machine translation and summarization is significantly lacking. Surprisingly, we find that mT0 had the best overall performance for cross-lingual QA, better than the state-of-the-art supervised model (i.e. fine-tuned mT5) and GPT-4 on African languages. Similarly, we find the recent Aya model to have comparable result to mT0 in almost all tasks except for topic classification where it outperform mT0. Overall, LLaMa 2 showed the worst performance, which we believe is due to its English and code-centric~(around 98%) pre-training corpus. Our findings confirms that performance on African languages continues to remain a hurdle for the current LLMs, underscoring the need for additional efforts to close this gap.

Read more

5/1/2024