Fishing for Magikarp: Automatically Detecting Under-trained Tokens in Large Language Models

2405.05417

YC

182

Reddit

0

Published 5/10/2024 by Sander Land, Max Bartolo

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Abstract

The disconnect between tokenizer creation and model training in language models has been known to allow for certain inputs, such as the infamous SolidGoldMagikarp token, to induce unwanted behaviour. Although such `glitch tokens' that are present in the tokenizer vocabulary, but are nearly or fully absent in training, have been observed across a variety of different models, a consistent way of identifying them has been missing. We present a comprehensive analysis of Large Language Model (LLM) tokenizers, specifically targeting this issue of detecting untrained and under-trained tokens. Through a combination of tokenizer analysis, model weight-based indicators, and prompting techniques, we develop effective methods for automatically detecting these problematic tokens. Our findings demonstrate the prevalence of such tokens across various models and provide insights into improving the efficiency and safety of language models.

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Overview

  • The paper discusses the issue of "glitch tokens" in large language models (LLMs), which are tokens that are present in the tokenizer vocabulary but are nearly or fully absent from the training data.
  • These problematic tokens can induce unwanted behavior in LLMs, as seen with the infamous "SolidGoldMagikarp" token.
  • The researchers present a comprehensive analysis of LLM tokenizers, aiming to develop effective methods for automatically detecting these under-trained tokens.

Plain English Explanation

Large language models like GPT-3 are trained on vast amounts of text data to become highly capable at tasks like language generation and understanding. However, the process of creating the tokenizer - the system that converts text into the numerical inputs the model understands - can sometimes lead to issues.

One problem is the existence of "glitch tokens," which are rare or nonsensical words that make it into the tokenizer's vocabulary, but are hardly ever seen in the actual training data. This can cause the model to behave unexpectedly when faced with these tokens, like the infamous "SolidGoldMagikarp" example.

To address this, the researchers in this paper aimed to develop reliable ways to identify these problematic tokens. They analyzed the tokenizers and model weights of various large language models, as well as tried different prompting techniques, to find effective methods for detecting under-trained tokens. Their findings suggest that this issue is quite prevalent across many different models, and they provide insights on how to make language models more efficient and safer.

Technical Explanation

The paper presents a comprehensive analysis of LLM tokenizers and their tendency to include "glitch tokens" - tokens that are present in the tokenizer vocabulary but are nearly or fully absent from the model's training data.

The researchers combined several approaches to detect these problematic tokens:

  1. Tokenizer analysis: Examining the tokenizer's vocabulary and identifying tokens with low training corpus frequency.
  2. Model weight-based indicators: Analyzing the model's weight matrices to find tokens with anomalous representations.
  3. Prompting techniques: Designing specialized prompts to trigger unwanted behavior from the model when using suspect tokens.

Through this multi-faceted approach, the researchers were able to effectively identify glitch tokens across a variety of large language models. Their findings demonstrate the prevalence of this issue and provide insights that can help improve the efficiency and safety of LLMs.

Critical Analysis

The researchers acknowledge that their methods for detecting glitch tokens, while effective, are not exhaustive. There may be other types of problematic tokens or edge cases that their approach does not capture. Additionally, the paper does not delve into the underlying causes of these glitch tokens or propose comprehensive solutions to prevent their occurrence in the first place.

Further research is needed to fully understand the process of tokenization in LLMs and develop more robust techniques for ensuring the integrity of the tokenizer vocabulary. The paper also does not address potential issues of linguistic discrimination that could arise from the presence of glitch tokens, which is an important consideration for the responsible development of these models.

Conclusion

This paper highlights a critical issue in the development of large language models - the presence of "glitch tokens" that can induce unwanted behavior. By combining various analysis methods, the researchers have developed effective techniques for detecting these problematic tokens across different LLMs.

Their findings shed light on the importance of thoroughly examining the tokenization process and model weights to ensure the safety and reliability of these powerful AI systems. As the field of large language model research continues to advance, addressing issues like glitch tokens will be crucial for building language models that are not only highly capable, but also trustworthy and aligned with societal values.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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