Bridging the Empirical-Theoretical Gap in Neural Network Formal Language Learning Using Minimum Description Length

2402.10013

YC

68

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0

Published 6/7/2024 by Nur Lan, Emmanuel Chemla, Roni Katzir

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Abstract

Neural networks offer good approximation to many tasks but consistently fail to reach perfect generalization, even when theoretical work shows that such perfect solutions can be expressed by certain architectures. Using the task of formal language learning, we focus on one simple formal language and show that the theoretically correct solution is in fact not an optimum of commonly used objectives -- even with regularization techniques that according to common wisdom should lead to simple weights and good generalization (L1, L2) or other meta-heuristics (early-stopping, dropout). On the other hand, replacing standard targets with the Minimum Description Length objective (MDL) results in the correct solution being an optimum.

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Overview

  • Neural networks can approximate many tasks well, but they struggle to achieve perfect generalization, even when the correct solution is theoretically possible.
  • This paper focuses on the task of formal language learning, examining a simple formal language and showing that the theoretically correct solution is not an optimum of commonly used objectives, even with regularization techniques.
  • The paper proposes using the Minimum Description Length (MDL) objective instead, which results in the correct solution being an optimum.

Plain English Explanation

Neural networks are powerful machine learning models that can be trained to perform a wide variety of tasks, such as image recognition, language processing, and network reconstruction. However, even when the correct solution to a problem can be expressed by the neural network's architecture, the model may still fail to generalize perfectly.

In this paper, the researchers focus on the task of formal language learning, which involves teaching a neural network to recognize and generate a specific type of formal language. They show that the theoretically correct solution to this task is not an optimum of the commonly used objective functions, even when using techniques like L1 or L2 regularization, which are supposed to encourage simple, generalizable models.

The researchers propose an alternative approach, using the Minimum Description Length (MDL) objective instead. This objective function encourages the neural network to find the most compressed representation of the data, which in this case leads to the correct solution being an optimum.

Technical Explanation

The paper explores the limitations of neural networks in achieving perfect generalization, even when the correct solution can be expressed by the network's architecture. Using the task of formal language learning as a case study, the researchers examine a simple formal language and show that the theoretically correct solution is not an optimum of commonly used objective functions, such as cross-entropy loss.

The researchers experiment with various regularization techniques, including L1 and L2 regularization, which are often used to encourage simple, generalizable models. However, they find that these techniques do not lead to the correct solution being an optimum.

To address this issue, the researchers propose using the Minimum Description Length (MDL) objective. This objective function encourages the neural network to find the most compressed representation of the data, which in this case results in the correct solution being an optimum.

The paper provides detailed experiments and analyses to support their findings. They compare the performance of neural networks trained with the standard objective functions and the MDL objective on the formal language learning task, demonstrating the superiority of the MDL approach in finding the theoretically correct solution.

Critical Analysis

The paper raises an important issue regarding the limitations of neural networks in achieving perfect generalization, even when the correct solution can be expressed by the network's architecture. This finding challenges the common belief that neural networks can learn any function given enough data and computational resources.

The researchers' use of the formal language learning task as a case study provides a clear and well-defined problem domain to explore this phenomenon. However, it is worth considering whether the insights from this specific task can be generalized to other domains or if there are unique characteristics of formal language learning that contribute to the observed issues.

Additionally, the paper does not extensively discuss the potential reasons why the commonly used objective functions, even with regularization techniques, fail to find the correct solution. Further exploration of the underlying factors and the specific properties of the MDL objective that enable the correct solution to be an optimum could provide deeper insights into the problem.

While the MDL approach is shown to be effective in this particular case, it would be valuable to investigate its performance and generalization across a broader range of tasks and problem domains. Comparative studies with other alternative objective functions or meta-heuristics could also shed light on the relative strengths and weaknesses of the different approaches.

Conclusion

This paper highlights an intriguing challenge in the field of neural network research: the inability of commonly used objective functions to consistently find the theoretically correct solutions, even when the network architecture is capable of representing such solutions.

The researchers' focus on the formal language learning task and their proposal of the Minimum Description Length (MDL) objective as an alternative approach provide a compelling case study and a potential solution to this problem. The findings suggest that the way we formulate and optimize neural network objectives can have a significant impact on the model's ability to generalize correctly.

The insights from this paper have broader implications for the development of more robust and generalizable neural network models, as well as the ongoing quest to understand the fundamental limitations and capabilities of these powerful machine learning techniques. As the field of artificial intelligence continues to evolve, studies like this one will likely play an important role in guiding the research community towards more effective and reliable neural network architectures and training strategies.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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