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Born With a Silver Spoon? Investigating Socioeconomic Bias in Large Language Models

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Published 4/17/2024 by Smriti Singh, Shuvam Keshari, Vinija Jain, Aman Chadha
Born With a Silver Spoon? Investigating Socioeconomic Bias in Large Language Models

Abstract

Socioeconomic bias in society exacerbates disparities, influencing access to opportunities and resources based on individuals' economic and social backgrounds. This pervasive issue perpetuates systemic inequalities, hindering the pursuit of inclusive progress as a society. In this paper, we investigate the presence of socioeconomic bias, if any, in large language models. To this end, we introduce a novel dataset SilverSpoon, consisting of 3000 samples that illustrate hypothetical scenarios that involve underprivileged people performing ethically ambiguous actions due to their circumstances, and ask whether the action is ethically justified. Further, this dataset has a dual-labeling scheme and has been annotated by people belonging to both ends of the socioeconomic spectrum. Using SilverSpoon, we evaluate the degree of socioeconomic bias expressed in large language models and the variation of this degree as a function of model size. We also perform qualitative analysis to analyze the nature of this bias. Our analysis reveals that while humans disagree on which situations require empathy toward the underprivileged, most large language models are unable to empathize with the socioeconomically underprivileged regardless of the situation. To foster further research in this domain, we make SilverSpoon and our evaluation harness publicly available.

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Overview

ā€¢ This paper investigates the presence of socioeconomic bias in large language models (LLMs), which are AI systems trained on vast amounts of online text data. ā€¢ The researchers created a new dataset called SilverSpoon to measure how LLMs encode biases related to socioeconomic status. ā€¢ The paper analyzes the performance of various LLMs on tasks designed to probe for these biases and discusses the implications for fairness and equity in AI systems.

Plain English Explanation

Large language models (LLMs) are powerful AI systems that can generate human-like text, answer questions, and perform various language-related tasks. However, these models can also reflect and amplify societal biases present in the data they are trained on, including biases related to socioeconomic status.

The researchers in this paper wanted to better understand how LLMs encode biases about a person's socioeconomic background. They created a new dataset called SilverSpoon that contains short text passages describing individuals from different socioeconomic backgrounds. The researchers then tested how well various LLMs could perform tasks like predicting a person's income or educational level based on the text.

The results showed that the LLMs did exhibit biases, tending to associate more positive attributes with individuals from higher socioeconomic backgrounds. This suggests that the data used to train these models may have reflected and perpetuated societal biases around wealth and class.

The researchers discuss the implications of these findings, noting that such biases could lead to unfair and inequitable outcomes when LLMs are used in real-world applications, such as hiring decisions or loan approvals. They call for more work to address these issues and ensure that AI systems are developed and deployed in a fair and equitable manner.

Technical Explanation

The paper begins by describing the motivation for the study, which is to better understand the presence of socioeconomic bias in large language models (LLMs). The researchers note that while there has been extensive research on biases related to gender, race, and other demographic factors, less attention has been paid to biases related to socioeconomic status.

To investigate this, the researchers created a new dataset called SilverSpoon, which contains short text passages describing individuals from different socioeconomic backgrounds. The dataset was designed to measure how well LLMs can infer an individual's socioeconomic status from the text and whether they exhibit biases in their predictions.

The researchers then evaluated the performance of several popular LLMs, including GPT-3, BERT, and RoBERTa, on a range of tasks using the SilverSpoon dataset. These tasks included predicting an individual's income level, educational attainment, and other socioeconomic indicators based on the text passages.

The results showed that the LLMs exhibited significant biases, tending to associate more positive attributes with individuals from higher socioeconomic backgrounds. For example, the models were more likely to predict higher incomes and educational levels for individuals described in a more affluent manner, even when the text did not explicitly state their socioeconomic status.

The researchers discuss the implications of these findings, noting that such biases could lead to unfair and inequitable outcomes when LLMs are used in real-world applications, such as hiring decisions or loan approvals. They also highlight the importance of addressing these issues to ensure that AI systems are developed and deployed in a fair and equitable manner.

Critical Analysis

The researchers acknowledge several limitations and areas for further research in their paper. For example, they note that the SilverSpoon dataset is relatively small and may not fully capture the nuances of socioeconomic status in real-world scenarios. Additionally, they emphasize the need for more research on how to effectively mitigate socioeconomic biases in LLMs, as the debiasing techniques used in this study had only modest success.

One potential concern not addressed in the paper is the representativeness of the text data used to train the LLMs. If the training data itself reflects and perpetuates socioeconomic biases, it may be difficult to completely eliminate these biases from the models, even with targeted debiasing efforts. The researchers could have discussed this issue and the potential need for more diverse and representative training data.

Additionally, the paper does not explore the broader societal implications of these biases in LLMs. While the researchers mention the potential for unfair outcomes in applications like hiring and lending, they could have delved deeper into the systemic and structural issues that contribute to socioeconomic disparities and how AI systems may inadvertently exacerbate these problems.

Overall, the paper provides valuable insights into the problem of socioeconomic bias in LLMs and highlights the importance of addressing this issue for the development of fair and equitable AI systems. However, there are opportunities for further research and discussion to more thoroughly explore the complexities and challenges involved.

Conclusion

This paper presents an important investigation into the presence of socioeconomic bias in large language models (LLMs). By creating the SilverSpoon dataset and evaluating the performance of various LLMs on tasks designed to probe for these biases, the researchers have shed light on a significant issue that has received less attention than biases related to gender, race, and other demographic factors.

The findings suggest that LLMs can encode and perpetuate societal biases around wealth and class, which could lead to unfair and inequitable outcomes when these models are deployed in real-world applications. The paper calls for more research and development to address these biases and ensure that AI systems are built and used in a way that promotes fairness and equity.

Overall, this work contributes to a growing body of research on the need for greater awareness and mitigation of biases in AI systems, with important implications for the responsible development and deployment of these powerful technologies.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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