Biology-inspired joint distribution neurons based on Hierarchical Correlation Reconstruction allowing for multidirectional neural networks

2405.05097

YC

36

Reddit

1

Published 5/9/2024 by Jarek Duda

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Abstract

Popular artificial neural networks (ANN) optimize parameters for unidirectional value propagation, assuming some guessed parametrization type like Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) or Kolmogorov-Arnold Network (KAN). In contrast, for biological neurons e.g. it is not uncommon for axonal propagation of action potentials to happen in both directions cite{axon} - suggesting they are optimized to continuously operate in multidirectional way. Additionally, statistical dependencies a single neuron could model is not just (expected) value dependence, but entire joint distributions including also higher moments. Such agnostic joint distribution neuron would allow for multidirectional propagation (of distributions or values) e.g. $rho(x|y,z)$ or $rho(y,z|x)$ by substituting to $rho(x,y,z)$ and normalizing. There will be discussed Hierarchical Correlation Reconstruction (HCR) for such neuron model: assuming $rho(x,y,z)=sum_{ijk} a_{ijk} f_i(x) f_j(y) f_k(z)$ type parametrization of joint distribution with polynomial basis $f_i$, which allows for flexible, inexpensive processing including nonlinearities, direct model estimation and update, trained through standard backpropagation or novel ways for such structure up to tensor decomposition. Using only pairwise (input-output) dependencies, its expected value prediction becomes KAN-like with trained activation functions as polynomials, can be extended by adding higher order dependencies through included products - in conscious interpretable way, allowing for multidirectional propagation of both values and probability densities.

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Overview

  • Popular artificial neural networks (ANNs) optimize parameters for unidirectional value propagation, assuming a specific parametrization like Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) or Kolmogorov-Arnold Network (KAN).
  • Biological neurons can propagate action potentials bidirectionally, suggesting they are optimized for multidirectional operation.
  • A single neuron could model statistical dependencies beyond just expected value, including entire joint distributions and higher moments.
  • The paper discusses Hierarchical Correlation Reconstruction (HCR), a neuron model that allows for flexible, inexpensive processing of multidirectional propagation of both values and probability densities.

Plain English Explanation

Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are a type of machine learning model inspired by the human brain. Typically, these models are designed to propagate information in a single direction, from the input to the output. This means they optimize their parameters to make predictions based on a specific type of input-output relationship, like a Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) or Kolmogorov-Arnold Network (KAN).

However, real biological neurons in the brain can transmit signals in both directions along their axons. This suggests that biological neurons are optimized to operate in a more multidirectional way, rather than just unidirectionally. Additionally, a single neuron in the brain may be able to model more complex statistical dependencies, not just the expected value of the output, but the entire joint distribution of the input and output variables, including higher moments like variance and skewness.

The paper introduces a neuron model called Hierarchical Correlation Reconstruction (HCR) that aims to capture this multidirectional and more flexible statistical modeling. HCR assumes a specific parametrization of the joint distribution of the inputs and outputs, which allows for efficient processing of both values and probability densities in multiple directions. This could lead to more accurate and robust artificial neural networks that are better aligned with the way biological neurons operate.

Technical Explanation

The paper proposes a neuron model called Hierarchical Correlation Reconstruction (HCR) that aims to go beyond the unidirectional value propagation assumptions of popular artificial neural network (ANN) architectures like Multi-Layer Perceptrons (MLPs) and Kolmogorov-Arnold Networks (KANs).

The key idea is that biological neurons often exhibit bidirectional propagation of action potentials along their axons, suggesting they are optimized for multidirectional operation. Additionally, a single neuron may be able to model not just the expected value dependence between inputs and outputs, but the entire joint probability distribution, including higher moments like variance and skewness.

The HCR neuron model assumes a specific parametrization of the joint distribution, $\rho(x,y,z) = \sum_{ijk} a_{ijk} f_i(x) f_j(y) f_k(z)$, where $f_i$ are a polynomial basis. This allows for flexible, inexpensive processing of multidirectional propagation of both values and probability densities, such as $\rho(x|y,z)$ or $\rho(y,z|x)$, by substituting and normalizing the joint distribution.

The authors show that using only pairwise (input-output) dependencies, the expected value prediction of HCR becomes KAN-like, with trained activation functions as polynomials. This can be extended by adding higher-order dependencies through the included products, in an interpretable way that allows for multidirectional propagation.

Critical Analysis

The paper presents an interesting neuron model that aims to capture more complex statistical dependencies and multidirectional propagation, which could lead to more accurate and robust artificial neural networks. However, there are a few potential caveats and areas for further research:

  • The paper focuses on the theoretical formulation of the HCR neuron model, but does not provide extensive experimental validation or comparisons to other state-of-the-art neuron models like Hebbian learning or task-specific neuron architectures. Empirical evaluations on real-world tasks would help demonstrate the practical benefits of the HCR approach.

  • The computational complexity and scalability of the HCR model are not thoroughly discussed. As the number of input and output variables increases, the number of parameters in the joint distribution parametrization may grow rapidly, potentially leading to challenges in training and inference.

  • The paper does not address how the HCR model could be integrated into larger hierarchical neural network architectures or how it might interact with other biologically-inspired neuron models and learning rules.

Overall, the HCR neuron model presents an interesting theoretical direction for exploring more flexible and biologically-plausible neuron representations in artificial neural networks. Further empirical validation and integration with other advancements in neural network architecture and learning could help assess the practical significance of this approach.

Conclusion

The paper introduces the Hierarchical Correlation Reconstruction (HCR) neuron model, which aims to go beyond the unidirectional value propagation assumptions of popular artificial neural network architectures. HCR allows for flexible, inexpensive processing of multidirectional propagation of both values and probability densities, inspired by the bidirectional signal transmission observed in biological neurons.

By modeling the entire joint distribution of inputs and outputs, rather than just expected value dependencies, HCR could lead to more accurate and robust artificial neural networks that better capture the complex statistical relationships present in real-world data. However, further empirical validation, analysis of computational complexity, and integration with other biologically-inspired neuron models are needed to fully assess the potential impact of this approach.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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