Beyond Memorization: Violating Privacy Via Inference with Large Language Models

2310.07298

YC

127

Reddit

0

Published 5/7/2024 by Robin Staab, Mark Vero, Mislav Balunovi'c, Martin Vechev

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Abstract

Current privacy research on large language models (LLMs) primarily focuses on the issue of extracting memorized training data. At the same time, models' inference capabilities have increased drastically. This raises the key question of whether current LLMs could violate individuals' privacy by inferring personal attributes from text given at inference time. In this work, we present the first comprehensive study on the capabilities of pretrained LLMs to infer personal attributes from text. We construct a dataset consisting of real Reddit profiles, and show that current LLMs can infer a wide range of personal attributes (e.g., location, income, sex), achieving up to $85%$ top-1 and $95%$ top-3 accuracy at a fraction of the cost ($100times$) and time ($240times$) required by humans. As people increasingly interact with LLM-powered chatbots across all aspects of life, we also explore the emerging threat of privacy-invasive chatbots trying to extract personal information through seemingly benign questions. Finally, we show that common mitigations, i.e., text anonymization and model alignment, are currently ineffective at protecting user privacy against LLM inference. Our findings highlight that current LLMs can infer personal data at a previously unattainable scale. In the absence of working defenses, we advocate for a broader discussion around LLM privacy implications beyond memorization, striving for a wider privacy protection.

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Overview

  • Current privacy research on large language models (LLMs) primarily focuses on the issue of extracting memorized training data.
  • LLMs' inference capabilities have increased drastically, raising the question of whether they could violate individuals' privacy by inferring personal attributes from text.
  • This work presents the first comprehensive study on the capabilities of pretrained LLMs to infer personal attributes from text.

Plain English Explanation

Large language models (LLMs) are powerful AI systems that can understand and generate human-like text. Researchers have been studying how these models might compromise privacy by accidentally revealing information from their training data. However, the provided research paper suggests that the real privacy threat may come from LLMs' ability to infer personal details about individuals based on the text they interact with.

The researchers built a dataset of real Reddit profiles and found that current LLMs can accurately guess a wide range of personal attributes, such as location, income, and sex, just by analyzing a person's text. This is concerning because as more people interact with LLM-powered chatbots in their daily lives, these chatbots could try to extract sensitive personal information through seemingly harmless questions.

The researchers also tested common privacy protection methods, like text anonymization and model alignment, and found them to be ineffective against LLM inference. This suggests that the current generation of LLMs poses a significant and previously underappreciated threat to individual privacy.

Technical Explanation

The researchers constructed a dataset of real Reddit user profiles, including their self-reported personal attributes such as location, income, and sex. They then tested the ability of various pretrained LLMs, including GPT-2 and BERT, to infer these personal attributes from the text in the user profiles.

The results showed that current LLMs can achieve up to 85% top-1 and 95% top-3 accuracy in inferring personal attributes, at a fraction of the cost (100x) and time (240x) required by humans. This demonstrates that LLMs have a previously unattainable capability to infer sensitive personal information from text.

The researchers also explored the threat of privacy-invasive chatbots, which could try to extract personal information from users through seemingly benign questions. Additionally, they found that common privacy protection methods, such as text anonymization and model alignment, are currently ineffective against LLM inference (Unveiling the Misuse Potential of Base Large Language Models, Aspects of Human Memory in Large Language Models).

Critical Analysis

The paper provides a comprehensive and well-designed study on the privacy risks posed by current LLMs. The researchers' use of real-world Reddit user data adds significant realism and relevance to their findings.

However, the paper does not address potential biases or limitations in the Reddit dataset, which could affect the generalizability of the results. Additionally, the paper does not explore the implications of these privacy risks for specific vulnerable populations or marginalized groups.

While the researchers highlight the ineffectiveness of current privacy protection methods, they do not propose any concrete solutions or mitigation strategies. More research is needed to develop effective defenses against LLM-based privacy attacks.

Conclusion

This research paper presents a groundbreaking and concerning study on the privacy risks posed by current large language models. The findings suggest that LLMs can infer a wide range of sensitive personal attributes from text, at a scale and accuracy that was previously unattainable.

As LLM-powered chatbots become more prevalent in our daily lives, this threat could become a significant challenge for individual privacy. The lack of effective defenses highlighted in the paper underscores the urgent need for a broader discussion and research effort to address the privacy implications of large language models.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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