AWQ: Activation-aware Weight Quantization for LLM Compression and Acceleration

2306.00978

YC

9

Reddit

0

Published 4/23/2024 by Ji Lin, Jiaming Tang, Haotian Tang, Shang Yang, Wei-Ming Chen, Wei-Chen Wang, Guangxuan Xiao, Xingyu Dang, Chuang Gan, Song Han

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Abstract

Large language models (LLMs) have fundamentally transformed the capabilities of numerous applications, from natural language processing to more intricate domain-specific tasks in robotics and autonomous driving. Moreover, the importance of on-device LLMs has grown significantly in the recent years. Running LLMs on edge devices not only promises reduced latency and improved user experience but also aligns with the increasing need for user privacy, as data processing can occur locally. However, the astronomical model sizes of modern LLMs and constraints of the edge devices, primarily in terms of memory size and bandwidth, pose significant deployment challenges. In this paper, we propose Activation-aware Weight Quantization (AWQ), a hardware-friendly approach for LLM low-bit weight-only quantization. Our method is based on the observation that weights are not equally important: protecting only 1% of salient weights can greatly reduce quantization error. We then propose to search for the optimal per-channel scaling that protects the salient weights by observing the activation, not weights. AWQ does not rely on any backpropagation or reconstruction, so it can well preserve LLMs' generalization ability on different domains and modalities, without overfitting to the calibration set. AWQ outperforms existing work on various language modeling and domain-specific benchmarks (coding and math). Thanks to better generalization, it achieves excellent quantization performance for instruction-tuned LMs and, for the first time, multi-modal LMs. Alongside AWQ, we implement TinyChat, an efficient and flexible inference framework tailored for on-device LLM/VLMs, offering more than 3x speedup over the Huggingface FP16 implementation on both desktop and mobile GPUs. It also democratizes the deployment of the 70B Llama-2 model on mobile GPUs.

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Overview

  • Large language models (LLMs) have significantly improved numerous applications, from natural language processing to robotics and autonomous driving.
  • The importance of running LLMs on edge devices has grown, as it promises reduced latency, improved user experience, and better user privacy.
  • However, the large model sizes and constraints of edge devices pose significant deployment challenges.

Plain English Explanation

Large language models (LLMs) are powerful AI systems that can understand and generate human-like text. These models have revolutionized many industries, from helping computers communicate in natural language to powering advanced robotics and self-driving cars.

One exciting development is the ability to run these LLMs on edge devices, like smartphones and tablets. This local processing offers several benefits, such as faster response times, better privacy (since data doesn't need to be sent to a remote server), and a smoother user experience. Imagine asking your phone a question and getting an instant, personalized response, without your information leaving the device.

However, deploying these massive LLMs on edge devices is challenging. The models are astronomically large, often billions of parameters, while edge devices have limited memory and processing power. It's like trying to fit a skyscraper into a tiny shed - the pieces just don't fit.

Technical Explanation

This paper presents a new approach called Activation-aware Weight Quantization (AWQ) to address the challenge of running LLMs on edge devices. The key insight is that not all the model's weights (the internal parameters that define its behavior) are equally important. By protecting only the most critical 1% of the weights, the researchers were able to significantly reduce the model size without sacrificing performance.

The unique aspect of AWQ is that it determines which weights to protect by observing the model's activations (the intermediate outputs during the computation) rather than the weights themselves. This allows for better generalization to different domains and modalities without overfitting to a specific calibration set.

The paper also introduces TinyChat, an efficient and flexible inference framework tailored for running LLMs on edge devices. TinyChat achieves over 3x speedup compared to existing solutions, enabling the deployment of even the largest LLMs, like the 70B parameter Llama-2 model, on mobile GPUs.

Critical Analysis

The paper presents a compelling approach to the problem of deploying LLMs on edge devices, but there are a few potential areas for further exploration:

  • The authors mention that AWQ does not rely on any backpropagation or reconstruction, which may limit its ability to adapt to different model architectures or tasks. It would be interesting to see how well the method generalizes to a wider range of LLM types and applications.
  • The paper focuses on weight quantization, but there may be other techniques, such as model pruning or distillation, that could further reduce the model size and improve performance on edge devices.
  • The evaluation is primarily conducted on language modeling and domain-specific tasks like coding and math. It would be valuable to assess the approach's effectiveness on more diverse applications, including multi-modal tasks that combine text, images, and other modalities.

Overall, the research presents a promising step towards making powerful LLMs more accessible and practical for real-world, on-device applications.

Conclusion

The paper introduces a novel quantization technique called Activation-aware Weight Quantization (AWQ) that enables efficient and accurate deployment of large language models (LLMs) on edge devices. By selectively protecting the most critical weights and leveraging activation data, AWQ achieves impressive performance gains while maintaining the models' generalization abilities.

Alongside AWQ, the researchers developed TinyChat, an efficient inference framework that further boosts the performance of LLMs on mobile and desktop GPUs. These advancements could pave the way for a new generation of intelligent, privacy-preserving applications that bring the power of LLMs directly to users' fingertips.

As the field of on-device AI continues to evolve, this work highlights the importance of innovative approaches that address the unique challenges of running large-scale models on resource-constrained edge devices. By bridging the gap between cutting-edge AI and practical real-world deployment, the researchers have made a valuable contribution to the ongoing quest to democratize the benefits of advanced language models.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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