Automatic Authorities: Power and AI

2404.05990

YC

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Published 4/10/2024 by Seth Lazar

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Abstract

As rapid advances in Artificial Intelligence and the rise of some of history's most potent corporations meet the diminished neoliberal state, people are increasingly subject to power exercised by means of automated systems. Machine learning and related computational technologies now underpin vital government services. They connect consumers and producers in new algorithmic markets. They determine how we find out about everything from how to vote to where to get vaccinated, and whose speech is amplified, reduced, or restricted. And a new wave of products based on Large Language Models (LLMs) will further transform our economic and political lives. Automatic Authorities are automated computational systems used to exercise power over us by determining what we may know, what we may have, and what our options will be. In response to their rise, scholars working on the societal impacts of AI and related technologies have advocated shifting attention from how to make AI systems beneficial or fair towards a critical analysis of these new power relations. But power is everywhere, and is not necessarily bad. On what basis should we object to new or intensified power relations, and what can be done to justify them? This paper introduces the philosophical materials with which to formulate these questions, and offers preliminary answers. It starts by pinning down the concept of power, focusing on the ability that some agents have to shape others' lives. It then explores how AI enables and intensifies the exercise of power so understood, and sketches three problems with power and three ways to solve those problems. It emphasises, in particular, that justifying power requires more than satisfying substantive justificatory criteria; standards of proper authority and procedural legitimacy must also be met. We need to know not only what power may be used for, but how it may be used, and by whom.

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Overview

  • As AI and powerful corporations grow, people are increasingly subject to power exercised through automated systems
  • Machine learning and related technologies now underpin vital government services, consumer markets, and information access
  • A new wave of large language models (LLMs) will further transform our economic and political lives
  • Scholars advocate shifting focus from making AI "beneficial" to critically analyzing these new power relations

Plain English Explanation

As artificial intelligence (AI) models and technologies become more advanced and powerful corporations gain more influence, people are finding themselves increasingly subject to power that is exercised through automated computer systems. These machine learning and related technologies now form the backbone of important government services, the way consumers interact with businesses, and how people find information on everything from voting to health care. And a new generation of large language models (LLMs) is set to transform our economic and political landscapes even further.

In response, scholars studying the societal impacts of AI and related tech are suggesting we should shift our focus away from simply trying to make these systems "beneficial" or "fair." Instead, they argue we need to take a critical look at the new power dynamics and relationships that are emerging as a result of these technologies. After all, power is not inherently good or bad - the key is understanding how it is being used and by whom.

Technical Explanation

The paper introduces the philosophical foundations for analyzing the power dynamics enabled by the rise of AI and related computational technologies. It starts by defining power as the ability of some agents (e.g. governments, corporations) to shape the lives of others.

The paper then explores how AI, machine learning, and technologies like large language models are enabling and intensifying the exercise of this kind of power. It outlines three key problems with unchecked power:

  1. Power can be used to restrict what people know, what they have access to, and their range of options
  2. Power can be wielded without proper authority or procedural legitimacy
  3. Power relationships can become entrenched and difficult to challenge or change

To address these issues, the paper sketches three potential solutions:

  1. Ensuring power is used in ways that are substantively justified (i.e. for legitimate purposes)
  2. Establishing proper standards of authority and procedural legitimacy for how power is exercised
  3. Maintaining mechanisms to hold power-wielding agents accountable and enable power dynamics to evolve over time

Critical Analysis

The paper provides a thoughtful framework for critically examining the societal impacts of AI and related technologies, moving beyond simplistic notions of making them "beneficial." By framing the issues in terms of power dynamics, the authors encourage readers to think deeply about who holds power, how it is being used, and whether it is being wielded appropriately and with proper justification.

That said, the analysis could potentially be broadened to consider other dimensions of power, such as how it intersects with issues of inequality, discrimination, and marginalization. Additionally, the solutions proposed, while conceptually sound, may face significant practical challenges in terms of implementation and enforcement, which the paper does not fully explore.

Ultimately, this work serves as an important starting point for a more nuanced, critical dialogue around the societal role of AI and its allied technologies. By pushing us to think beyond simplistic notions of "beneficial AI," it encourages readers to grapple with the difficult questions of power, authority, and legitimacy that will be central to navigating the [AI-powered] future.

Conclusion

This paper lays the groundwork for a more critical examination of the power dynamics emerging as AI and related computational technologies become increasingly embedded in our social, economic, and political systems. By defining power as the ability to shape others' lives, and outlining key problems and potential solutions, the authors invite readers to think deeply about who holds power, how it is being used, and whether it is being exercised with proper justification and legitimacy. This type of nuanced, philosophical analysis is crucial as we navigate the transformative impacts of AI and large language models on our lives.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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