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An Analysis of the Math Requirements of 199 CS BS/BA Degrees at 158 U.S. Universities

2404.15177

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Published 4/24/2024 by Carla E. Brodley, McKenna Quam, Mark A. Weiss

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Abstract

For at least 40 years, there has been debate and disagreement as to the role of mathematics in the computer science curriculum. This paper presents the results of an analysis of the math requirements of 199 Computer Science BS/BA degrees from 158 U.S. universities, looking not only at which math courses are required, but how they are used as prerequisites (and corequisites) for computer science (CS) courses. Our analysis shows that while there is consensus that discrete math is critical for a CS degree, and further that calculus is almost always required for the BS in CS, there is little consensus as to when a student should have mastered these subjects. Based on our analysis of how math requirements impact access, retention and on-time degree completion for the BS and the BA in CS, we provide several recommendations for CS departments to consider.

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Overview

  • This paper examines the role of mathematics in computer science (CS) degree programs in the United States.
  • The researchers analyzed the math requirements of 199 CS bachelor's degree programs across 158 universities.
  • They looked at which math courses are required and how they are used as prerequisites or co-requisites for CS courses.

Plain English Explanation

The paper explores the longstanding debate around the importance of mathematics in computer science education. The researchers took a deep dive into the math requirements for 199 CS bachelor's degrees at 158 U.S. universities. They didn't just look at which math courses are required, but how those math courses are used as prerequisites or taken alongside CS courses.

The key finding is that there is widespread agreement that discrete math is critical for a CS degree, and that calculus is almost always required for a BS in CS. However, there is little consensus on when students should master these foundational math subjects.

Based on their analysis of how math requirements impact access, retention, and timely degree completion for both BS and BA CS programs, the researchers provide several recommendations for CS departments to consider. These recommendations aim to ensure that math requirements support student success in computer science programs.

Technical Explanation

The researchers conducted a comprehensive analysis of the math requirements across 199 CS bachelor's degree programs from 158 U.S. universities. They examined not only which specific math courses are required, but how those math courses are structured as prerequisites (or co-requisites) for various CS courses.

The results show broad agreement that discrete mathematics is a critical foundation for a CS degree. Similarly, calculus is almost universally required for the BS in CS. However, the analysis reveals little consensus on the optimal timing for students to complete these key math requirements.

The paper provides recommendations based on their findings about how math prerequisites impact access, retention, and on-time graduation for both the BS and BA in CS. These recommendations are intended to help CS departments structure their math requirements in a way that supports student success.

Critical Analysis

The researchers acknowledge several limitations to their study. For example, they were unable to capture nuances in how individual institutions apply their math prerequisites, as their analysis was based on publicly available degree program information.

Additionally, the paper does not delve deeply into the pedagogical rationale behind the various math requirements. Further research could explore the academic justifications and expected learning outcomes associated with specific math courses in CS curricula.

That said, the broad insights around the lack of consensus on math timing are compelling and worthy of further exploration. The researchers' recommendations provide a solid starting point for CS departments to critically evaluate their math requirements and their impact on student success.

Conclusion

This paper offers a comprehensive, data-driven analysis of the role of mathematics in computer science education. While there is broad agreement on the importance of discrete math and calculus, the optimal timing and integration of these foundational subjects remains an open question.

The researchers' recommendations provide a framework for CS departments to assess their math requirements and ensure they are supporting student access, retention, and timely degree completion. As the field of computer science continues to evolve, understanding the appropriate mathematical foundations will be crucial for preparing the next generation of computing professionals.



This summary was produced with help from an AI and may contain inaccuracies - check out the links to read the original source documents!

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